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April 1st I will be the new owner of an 2009 SV650SF pending that the weather is nice enough to pick the bike up. I cannot wait and I am very excited to be getting a new bike. I currently have a Ninja 250 and am very excited about having a bike with more potential.

I consider myself to be ahead of the learning curve. During the MSF course I was a natural and scored a perfect score on the test. Every since then I have been doing good, have never planted the bike or had an accident.

Regardless, I am for some reason scared. I really do not know what to expect going up another 400 CCs. I have driven 650 cruisers with my cousins' bikes but I feel nervous about the throttle response and even more nervous about the slick new tires. We have had 2 people on this forum that have both planted the bike on new tires at very low speeds.

Basically. I need some reassurance.

How about those framesliders? I am looking into them but definitely will not have them for when I get the bike. I plan to install myself.

I can't wait but there's this uneasiness about it.
 

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Congrats!

There's always going to be some degree of uneasiness, no matter how much experience one might have. The throttle response is very easy to tame - just stay calm and don't get worked up, especially when making slow-speed turns. Once you get used to the throttle, you can buy an R6 throttle tube and relearn all over again ;D (not really, it's not that much different...)
 

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You'll be fine. The Sv was my very first bike almost 2 months and I been doing just fine. So you should be good since you have previous experience with the 250.

Framesliders are a must, as for the new tires I have no clue at all. If I was to buy new tires for my bike I would be afraid riding them.
 

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Just be easy on the new tires. Try not to do any hard cornering or braking for about the first hundred miles. Other than that just try and have fun. :)
 

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You'll be fine. It's natural to be apprehensive. It takes some time to get used to the added power. (Personally, I think that part of the reason the manufacturers have break in periods is to break you in to the bike. You'll notice as you progress that the break in rpm zones represent bumps in hp as well.) My only advise is to practice good throttle control. Just roll on the throttle, don't crack it, and you'll be fine.

As for the tires, thousands of people ride around on new tires every year w/o incident. Yes, you should take it easy until they are scrubbed in, but the odds are you'll be fine. Enjoy.
 

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you started on a 250, so that illustrates at least some maturity haha.

i think being nervous is natural. it just means you respect the machine. that's a must in my humble opinion.

i asked the dealership to put the framesliders on mine. i liked the assurance from the start.

mind you, i had a 1300km ride home from the dealership.
 

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Relax, have fun, and enjoy the ride on arguably the most versatile and bestest bike out there.
 

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Have fun. :)

Get motosliders (they have a section on this board). You'll want the full fairing ones.

You can install them yourself (read posts on the tools you need). Spend some time riding around the lot and block of the dealer -- it does not matter if they think it's weird. It is much worse to fall over as you leave.

Stay off the main drag until you are comfortable with the controls -- brakes, shifting, foot down, directionals.

If you want gear advice etc., just post your questions. Post a pic of your bike (lots of pics) once you get it.

Enjoy!
 

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Like others have said, your repsect and recognition that the throttle can be dangerous is a good sign. I think that means you'll be fine. The folks more likely to be in trouble are those who don't even think about it.

I got my SVS as my first bike, and the throttle was scary to me too. I rest a finger or two on the brake to help me be aware of small wrist movements (the finger will move on the brake if my wrist moves even a little bit - and I'm much more sensitive to feeling movement against my finger) and to prevent throttle jerk on bumpy roads. Chances are your wrist is more attuned to throttle control than mine was (maybe even is now).

Dunno much about tires, but I'm sure you'll be fine. Lean your body more than the bike so the bike isn't pushing too hard sideways against the tire. (From what I hear that's a good practice generally.)
 

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I picked up my SV last September. I've been riding since 1981, but had been about 2 years off a bike when I got it. The day I picked it up, it was drizzling one of those drizzles that only seems to make the roads like ice. Needless to say, I was more than a little nervous riding it back to work, but made it there and home later with no problems.

Don't be scared. Nervous is okay; it will keep you focused, and from doing anything stupid. Try to relax on the controls, and remember the bike goes where and how you tell it to go, not the other way round.

Just make sure to post pictures when you get it. Oh, and I hear there is a pretty good market for the lower fairings, so you can sell them quite easily and then put the standard Motosliders on. The bike looks better without them.
 

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Get the motosliders for the SV650SF, do it now. Dont become a member of the "sliders-showed-up-to-my-door-today-but-went-down-yesterday" club ...
 

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You'll be fine, I was nervous as hell when I got my SV and I made out okay. Get sliders ASAP since motosliders have no cut sliders available now (Was not an option for me). The throttle is twitchy at first, but you get used to it.
 

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Welcome, I hadn't ridden for 4 years when I got my SV 2 months ago. The throttle was tricky at first (Idle to part throttle was a big change in power), but I got used to it quick, I had to adjust the throttle cables, and did the TPS adjustment. Now It does just what I want, when I want it. Have fun & keep the rubber side down.
 
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