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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So in lieu of this:
My new clip ons to handlebars swap (see: http://www.svrider.com/forum/showthread.php?p=2608804)

I mentioned that something was broken/missing- and as the observant steveSLO pointed out- It was the front brake reservoir.

The broken part-

Another Edit: This has been broken like this since i bought the bike as a front end wreck- it never leaked because the perch was hose clamped over this crack in such a way that it couldn't... taking everything apart opened this up and convinced me to fix it :)


So today I called around to 10+ different motorcycle/atv shops and ALSO harbour freight, pepboys and autozone... NO ONE had anything even remotely similar to a front brake res- I was just stumped... how could no one stock this- its the most generic simple thing... a cup with a lid and a nipple [tehe] ffs.

But where there is a will there is a way- I wasn't going to let this ruin my chance to ride today- and shortly after spending 10 hours moving a Sh1t load of stuff into our new office (yeah I should probably just have taken it easy but w/e) - I ran to home depot.




I don't know where my receipt is- if I find i will post part #'s-
Basically it's all 1 1/2" PVC - a Pipe end, a "glue in" coupler that has female threads on one end, a cap with male threads for the coupler (serves as the top/cap of the res), and lastly a 1/4 brass nipple/barb.




I used some gorrilla glue to get the coupler together- I found that it was actually VERY stuck (took 10 minute to get apart again) by just a good pound on there... but I wanted glue to be sure.



A quick pilot hole, careful with PVC in the vice It made a couple strange cracking sounds but I think that may have been the glue shifting as it was drying and changing shape in the vice- never the less I am sure the vice could kill some PVC easily.


With the hole drilled out:


Working the barb into the PVC is difficult if you dont get that hole drilled out just right- I didn't have a big enough bit so it took a few tries and carefully working the smaller bit around to make the hole large enough- The barb will cut its own thread, just takes some pressure and care.


The finished product minus possible paint or silly stickers...:



I tested it with some water, filled fully, capped- and holding it so the water would drip out of the barb ... it didn't- suction holds it in showing a good air tight seal. [ftw bill nye]

I let it sit that way for 20 minutes and got no drips :) So I am satisfied.

One thing to note is that I won't get the diaphragm into this setup but I don't think that will matter as its a good seal any way...

Now the question I just thought of - should it be totally air tight? haha Might that prevent fluid in res getting to the MC because of the suction?

Going to slap this on tomorrow and see how it works- Probably the most fugly thing on my SV but frankly I could care less- just wanna ride and spend 30 bucks on plastic parts that aren't in stock till next week :)

Peace!

Edit: As far as seeing the fluid level- I could never see through the side of the stock one (it was too foggy/opaque any way) so I am cool just checking fluid every few months by opening this cap.
 

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Uhh, is PVC rated to hold up to brake fluid?

Your stock reservoir looks just to be a broken tab. I suggest just using some hose clamps and a bracket to mount it to the handlebars.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Uhh, is PVC rated to hold up to brake fluid?

Your stock reservoir looks just to be a broken tab. I suggest just using some hose clamps and a bracket to mount it to the handlebars.
PVC will hold up to brake fluid- i did a bunch of google's on this before hand- it's plastic- and apparently most plastics aren't phased by brake fluid.

EDIT: https://www.spilltech.com/wcsstore/SpillTechUSCatalogAssetStore/Attachment/documents/ccg/CBOOM.pdf
PVC is marked as "G" [good] for brake fluid- but also N/D [no data] I assume because there are many different "Flavors" of brake fluid... I am guessing though that dot 3/4 was probably tested though as it's so common.
Also- look at the pic closer- the res I have is cracked where the perch mounted by it- it's got a HUGE crack in it... like 1/3 of the body....
 

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PVC will hold up to brake fluid- i did a bunch of google's on this before hand- it's plastic- and apparently most plastics aren't phased by brake fluid.

EDIT: https://www.spilltech.com/wcsstore/SpillTechUSCatalogAssetStore/Attachment/documents/ccg/CBOOM.pdf
PVC is marked as "G" [good] for brake fluid- but also N/D [no data] I assume because there are many different "Flavors" of brake fluid... I am guessing though that dot 3/4 was probably tested though as it's so common.
Also- look at the pic closer- the res I have is cracked where the perch mounted by it- it's got a HUGE crack in it... like 1/3 of the body....
A great time to learn to plastic weld. It's pretty easy to create water tight welds on plastic.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
A great time to learn to plastic weld. It's pretty easy to create water tight welds on plastic.
Yeah i was considering this, i Know the pvc glue basically "melts" the plastic too... I just was looking for a cheap fast fix and I happened to document it (not sure why actually haha..)

If it leaks at all plastic welding might be the next choice.
 

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Good on ya for coming up with an easy DIY solution. It really is great to see people come up with outside of the box fixes for their problems! :rock:
 

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Two things that spring to mind.
1. The diaphragm is there because the lid is vented. The diaphragm allows the fluid level to move as you squeeze the lever. Not having a vent means you will potentially vacuum lock the brakes (i.e. no brakes) especially if hot, or crack the reservoir, or blow the hose off. All undesirable things!
2. The PVC you have chosen does not have a high resistance to impact or drastic temperature change. These are also undesirable traits for a motorcycle part.

I applaud your lateral thinking, but would suggest just getting another reservoir from a bike wreckers. Probably less money than you outlayed for the plumbing parts and glue.
Doesn't have to be a specific SV part as they are common to a number of other brands. Just find one that looks close and adjust the mounting a little.

Oh and painting the PVC may well effect the structure of the plastic as well.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Lol- yeah i saw those- just wanted a fix asap :)

Two things that spring to mind.
1. The diaphragm is there because the lid is vented. The diaphragm allows the fluid level to move as you squeeze the lever. Not having a vent means you will potentially vacuum lock the brakes (i.e. no brakes) especially if hot, or crack the reservoir, or blow the hose off. All undesirable things!
2. The PVC you have chosen does not have a high resistance to impact or drastic temperature change. These are also undesirable traits for a motorcycle part.

I applaud your lateral thinking, but would suggest just getting another reservoir from a bike wreckers. Probably less money than you outlayed for the plumbing parts and glue.
Doesn't have to be a specific SV part as they are common to a number of other brands. Just find one that looks close and adjust the mounting a little.

Oh and painting the PVC may well effect the structure of the plastic as well.
Thanks for your input- yeah i was wondering if the stock setup was vented- I could easily add a breather hole on the cap- My thought though is that the reservoir should NEVER be under major pressure (negative or positive) ... that would signify a major problem anyway...the pressure is in the MC not in the res.

Also total for these parts was just under 6 bucks, I did not buy glue- just used some I had (gorilla glue)- as it was I didn't need glue likely because the main pieces that held this together were pressed/pounded into eachother...it took a slide hammer to get them apart and add the glue.. lol

Also- Just a disclaimer- I don't mean this to be offensive, just a sarcastic mofo :naughty: :

PVC isn't great in regard to shock - you are right- and that's why I mentioned the "care with the vice" - but I don't plan on using it as a belly pan or knee pucks so I think it should be okay.

Thanks for the positive feed back!
 

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The danger isn't in loosing brakes, it's in locking them. With heat comes expansion. If you don't vent the top the fluid will expand and it WILL pressurize the system which WILL lock up the brakes.

Brake systems aren't somthing to dick around with. Far to easy to get yourself killed. I highly recommend you either research the living hell out of this until you know brake systems like the back of your hand or just buy 5hit that's proven to work.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
The danger isn't in loosing brakes, it's in locking them. With heat comes expansion. If you don't vent the top the fluid will expand and it WILL pressurize the system which WILL lock up the brakes.

Brake systems aren't somthing to dick around with. Far to easy to get yourself killed. I highly recommend you either research the living hell out of this until you know brake systems like the back of your hand or just buy 5hit that's proven to work.
This doesn't make sense to me- reading about it how the whole hydraulic brake system- and considering my experiences with bleeding brakes.

if you have even half a centimeter of air in the line it will "smush" down and [obviously] take away from the braking power.

The same concept goes in reverse- As you said- under heat the brake fluid will have increased pressure- this makes perfect sense- however- could it really cause enough pressure within the system to "over pressure" the reservoir and [in turn] pressurize the back of the MC and enable the brakes??? I mean the thing is gonna have about 1.75 CUBIC inches of air sitting within it - 1.5" diameter [.75" radius x 1" tall] -- above the brake fluid that sits in there... even if there was MASSIVE back pressure in the reservoir it would just be compressing air- which would give it lots of "cushion"- thus not locking the brakes.

Perhaps I am missing something- I looked all over the stock reservoir- it has no "breather" holes or anything- yes the diaphragm is there- and this does the same thing as my "open" design- just with an extra piece of rubber to help seal things up (AFAIK and have read) - it gives a little bit of "air" "cushion" room above the reservoir's brake fluid to create that "buffer" and prevent lock up when the pressures in the system below change.

Sound good ? :)
 

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Brakes lock progressively. All it takes is enough pressure for the pads to touch the rotors. The heat from the rotors dragging will heat the pads until the fluid boils and the brakes actually lock.
 

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That is the most hideous thing I've ever seen...

Clever, but hideous. Waste of time and energy though considering they go on ebay for about $20... and the general consensus seems to be for you to replace it for your own safety anyway...

But goodluck with the test fitting!
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
So after more research I understand now that the purpose of the diaphragm is to prevent moisture in the air being absorbed into the brake fluid.

If this happens [water in the brake fluid] it rapidly lowers the boiling point of the fluid and THAT can cause the lockups and other problems.

SO I took my old reservoirs diaphragm and cut the edge of it real carefully- positioned it in my new reservoir-




Now we are in business. The lower area (with fluid) can pressurize and move up and down with fluid- and the upper area as AIR to compensate the fluids movement up and down.

And all works as it should- the brake fluid won't get any moisture in it.


EDIT:

That is the most hideous thing I've ever seen...

Clever, but hideous. Waste of time and energy though considering they go on ebay for about $20... and the general consensus seems to be for you to replace it for your own safety anyway...

But goodluck with the test fitting!

Don't think I haven't been thinking about this the whole time :) I am just a stubborn mofo.
 

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The front brake reservoir on my Ninja ZX6R started breaking off JUST like yours. What I did, yesterday, was apply some 5-minute epoxy and in 5 minutes it was just fine and sturdy.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
The front brake reservoir on my Ninja ZX6R started breaking off JUST like yours. What I did, yesterday, was apply some 5-minute epoxy and in 5 minutes it was just fine and sturdy.
Mine broke through the side of the reservoir though- there was a hole into the res- epoxy breaks up under brake fluid from what I have read.

If you are just fixing the perch that is fine- this was a broken perch and hole in the res... I researched epoxy- even jb weld (which is just epoxy) wont work if in content with brake fluid... turns in to play dough. :<
 

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if I remember correctly, the cap on the stock reservoir has a small groove to let air in between the cap and the rubber so air can move in and out as fluid moves up and down. There are many postings where people put custom reservoirs on their bikes and as they ride they find their front brakes slowly locking up until they can't move due to heat expansion. I like your solution to your problem and adding the rubber diaphragm is a plus, but I believe you should still vent the cap to allow for movement and expansion.
 

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dont mean to thread jack but while we're on topic, my rear brake reservoir's diaphragm (rubber insert thingy?) is "warped" and doesnt sit flush ontop of the reservoir's lid. some of it does and some of it doesnt. For instance, last time when cheking the fluid i found some brake fluid ontop of the diaphragm (and below it..) but im wondering, does this mean i need to get a new one?
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
dont mean to thread jack but while we're on topic, my rear brake reservoir's diaphragm (rubber insert thingy?) is "warped" and doesnt sit flush ontop of the reservoir's lid. some of it does and some of it doesnt. For instance, last time when cheking the fluid i found some brake fluid ontop of the diaphragm (and below it..) but im wondering, does this mean i need to get a new one?
Probably not a big deal- as I read earlier and mentioned above (somewhere up there haha) the diaphragm is there to prevent moisture getting into the brake fluid (this would lower it's boiling point)

It is unlikely that small gap would cause too much moisture to get through- however i'd think if you live in a particularly humid area that it would be best to replace it.

if I remember correctly, the cap on the stock reservoir has a small groove to let air in between the cap and the rubber so air can move in and out as fluid moves up and down. There are many postings where people put custom reservoirs on their bikes and as they ride they find their front brakes slowly locking up until they can't move due to heat expansion. I like your solution to your problem and adding the rubber diaphragm is a plus, but I believe you should still vent the cap to allow for movement and expansion.
You sir are very observant. I figured id grab a pic of this:



This means I will be add a little breather hole on the top of the res i've made.


Also anyone have a clue how well teflon tape holds up to brake fluid? I have noticed a tiny trip around the brass barb- think it is just seeping through the threads a little bit.
 
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