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Discussion Starter #1
Hi, newbie from Italy here, who tried searching the forum but didn't find a definitive answer.
I would like guidance on selecting an aftermarket rear shock: a basic one with preload and rebound adjustments will do.

Current set-up: 2016 3rd gen SV650 (mileage close to 10k) with stock rear shock that I'm starting to feel inadequate to say the least; for crying out loud it feels like a wooden peg with a truck spring wrapped around: my mountain bike has far more comfortable suspensions.
Every road bump transmits directly to my lower back, and when I'm riding with my wife her groans can be heard from miles away.

Rider info: 180lbs (81Kg), riding mostly alone on hills around the big lake where I live, a bit of motorways for commuting, a few rides with my wife (125lbs/56Kg) on the pillion during summer weekends, occasional longer trips. I don't do track.

Model-specific shocks that I can buy on-line in UE range from € 500 up to 800: Hyperpro 460, Wilbers 640 Road, Matris M46KD are among the options, but quite expensive.

Another (possibly cheaper) option would be to buy from YSS (a Thailand-based manufacturer, probably the largest producer of aftermarket motorcycle shock absorbers according to their website) a shock that is specific for a different bike: here in Italy these shocks have been widely used and got positive reviews.
To exploit this possibility I would need to find stock ammo complete specs (eye-to-eye lenght etc.) or compatibility list: for example, would an aftermarket shock for 2012-2015 Gladius fit my 3rd gen. SV?

Thanks for your advice.
 

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There's a thread here where someone used a GSXR600/750 shock if price is a concern. For me the stock one has plenty of spring weight (I'm a big guy) but very little damping.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks for help, guys.
I'm torn between buying a model-specific shock (mostly Hyperpro or Wilbers that sell for some €450 in my neck of the woods, while all the rest sell for more than 550, Nitron included) or try with an aftermarket for a different model that might fit (GSXR 600/750 as suggested, Gladius but not sure it will fit) that could sell for less.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Got a confirmation from suzuki workshop: Gladius 2015 rear shock part number is the same as for 3rd gen. SV650 one.

Off to the market for a 2015 Gladius shock I go!
 

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Got a confirmation from suzuki workshop: Gladius 2015 rear shock part number is the same as for 3rd gen. SV650 one.

Off to the market for a 2015 Gladius shock I go!
why would an aftermarket shock being sold as Gladius specific but grand new be cheaper than a 3rd gen shock, if that's an exploit that exists then that is really ridiculous.
 

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Not to put too fine a point on it but there is a reason mass produced stuff is cheaper from countries like Thailand, but I'll let you find that out at some point in your future. Good luck .
 

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Discussion Starter #8
why would an aftermarket shock being sold as Gladius specific but grand new be cheaper than a 3rd gen shock, if that's an exploit that exists then that is really ridiculous.
Not sure why it is like that, but it is.
An OEM replacement for SV 3rd gen shock sells for about € 250 here, and it has all the flaws we already know (and I have just discovered): not adjstable, sealed shock, no chance to service it, shot life span (mine after 10'000 miles feels like a wooden rod).
A YSS shock, preload and rebound adjustable, sells for 280.
Hyperpro and Wilbers (adjustable for preload and rebound) sell for about 450, with all the others (Matris, Nitron, Ohlins, etc.) selling for 600 minimum.

Here in Italy forums are full of satisfied customers reporting YSS shocks work well both on SV bikes and similar segment ones; I guess I'll find it out in first person if they're worth.
 

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If you're buying an aftermarket shock, IMO it's worth the extra money to get one with a reservoir and compression adjustability. Length adjustment is also significant, not sure if the single clickers have that.
 

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^^^^^^^ What he said. And I'll say this, those people who bought the YSS shocks and are satisfied are probably happy because they dont know what they're missing out on with the high/er end shocks but as they say ignorance is bliss.

I have length adjustment which is critical for setting the sag I believe. I have 16 levels of high speed compression, 26 levels of low speed compression, 24 levels of rebound adjustment aswell as preload adjustment and I can do it from the side of my bike with a twist of my fingers with a remote hydraulic reservoir.
 

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Devils, length adjustment is different from preload adjustment. Preload is a collar at the spring (or hydraulic as you have) while length is typically done with a pair of nuts near the bottom of the shock. You can have proper sag but improper ride height, or the other way around.

my Penske has:
High speed compression
Low speed compression
Rebound
Preload
Length

I only have a triple clicker because I found it for the right price, I'd have been happy with a twin clicker too. I wouldn't spend much extra for the triple, but the reservoir and compression are worth quite a bit.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Guys, thanks again for the valuable info.
I'm fairly new to motorcycles, but not to suspensions.

I'm riding mountainbikes (all-mountain/enduro full suspended ones) too since several years, so I know a bit about forks and shock options.

I understand the added value of high and low speed compression regulations, as well as an additional reservoir, I have them on my enduro MTB fork and shock, and definitely like them for riding at speed on dirt trails.

I simply don't think such advanced regulations on a road (beginners) bike like the SV are that much required: on a more advanced/sophisticated bike they definitely will, on the SV they're simply not worth. I'd rather sell the bike and buy a higher-end one than spend the money to convert it.

So far a decent preload and rebound regulation will be more than enough for me and the kind of roads I normally ride on.

Besides this, I'll spend the saved money in improving the fork (I'm planning next year to fit an aftermarket complete cartridge like Andreani or Matris) and possibly the front brake.

BTW, the YSS ammo I'm buying is lenght adjustable too, having 10mm regulation from 310 to 320mm, which means +-5mm around the 315mm nominal lenght.
 

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@Skywalker Your inexperience with motorbikes is obvious, you don't think the SV handles like a sack of **** enough to spend the money to upgrade it properly, rather you'd prefer to waste the money buying essentially a faster bike is what you are saying, all the other crap is immaterial, brakes and better suspension can all be done to the SV cheaper than what you'd buy a "high end" bike for and the SV will handle better too than most of your "high end" bikes with the proper upgrades done, but a faster engine can't really be done without spending as much as a new bike would cost anyway.

Also most people incl me can't ride an SV to its potential on the track or on the street, and you want to get a more powerful bike that isn't considered a beginners bike?
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Devils, either i'm not able to properly express myself, or you totally misunderstood me.

Either way I made up my mind, bought what i was looking for, so thanks for the help, I'm done here.
 

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Sometimes I think if I wanted a razor sharp handling bike that was track ready I would have bought a GSXR or one of the other alphabet soup bikes, maybe a Ducati 1299. I've owned stuff like that. Well, not a 1299. But I wanted a bike to go from point A to B on relatively fun and cheaply. And I could tinker around with for not a lot of money if the mood strikes. I bought an SV.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Sometimes I think if I wanted a razor sharp handling bike that was track ready I would have bought a GSXR or one of the other alphabet soup bikes.
Same for me.
I wanted a starter's bike, one that was (relatively) light, agile, and easy to work on.
The SV is perfect (for me) for this.
after 10'000 miles riding it, I'm starting to notice a few flaws, like the shock (too stiff), the fork (too soft) and (maybe) a front brake that is not that incisive.

If I can addres these flaws without investing a lot of money, I will do, because overall I like the bike and I don't need a more powerful one.
But if I have to spend half of what I paid the bike to tinker with it, I'll keep it as it is and trade it in for a better one in the future.
 

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Well bad news buddy you're more than likely going to have to spend at least a third what the bike cost to upgrade it and that's not even the best stuff on the market for it
 

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Discussion Starter #19
A third would be acceptable and it's what I have already budgeted.
I paid the bike € 6'000.
So far I replaced the muffler (€ 380), I'm buying a new shock (€ 280) and planning to ugrade the fork with a cartridge kit (€ 5/600): roughly € 1'250 for decent aftermarket parts.
I might throw in another € 4/500 for an improvement to the front brake (still undecided if I really feel the need for it), and I will be done with more or less a third of the cost of the bike, which will bring the total (bike + upgrades) in the € 7'800 ballpark.

If I were to spend some € 9'000+ on this bike buying top aftermarket components (which would surely be overkill on it), I'd rather sell it and buy a € 9'000+ new bike that won't need the upgrades I'm doing on this one.
 

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I plan on spending around $1k (US) on suspension for a new shock and fork cartridges after the bike gets some more miles on it (right now around 2500). Other than that, I'll do a few minor brake upgrades (pads, braided lines, high temp fluid), but that's about it.
 
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