Suzuki SV650 Riders Forum banner
21 - 35 of 35 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
926 Posts
Discussion Starter · #21 ·
I've been hearing lots of rumors regarding the RS 660 and reliability issues.
Just one of the reasons I stay with Japanese bikes.

and

"I know that answer is frustratingly unclear, but there is a good reason for that, as I would be remiss in my journalistic duties if I didn’t disclose a series of issues that we had on the Aprilia RS 660 during our test ride.
The bikes on review were pre-production models, and before we turned a wheel, Aprilia disclosed to us that some minor issues with the fueling and calibration were still being ironed out on these bikes back in Noale.
Virtually all of the machines on our launch had intermittent issues with ABS lights flickering constantly. My model also threw out a “check engine” light at the beginning of our ride, which wouldn’t clear on a full key restart.
Making matters worse, my particular Aprilia RS 660 (the second one off the assembly line, by the way), suffered from being hard to start when the motor was hot.
The real icing on the cake was when the bike shutdown completely while at speed, not once, but twice on our ride on California’s Highway 33.
As good as a motorcycle can be in every other regard, it is hard to recommend a machine to a reader when it has the above issues, and we can only review the motorcycle that is presented to us – not the manufacturer’s future intentions."
My thoughts precisely. I just had this conversation yesterday with a couple riders regarding a Suzuki vs KTM. At the end of the day, we all have to live with the bike we ride. I sold my BMW, I kept my Suzuki.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
81 Posts
I have an early RS 660, it's been good to go. One minor check engine light that was fixed in software (false alarm in the self diagnostics). It's a fabulous street sport bike.

I still have my SV.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,617 Posts
I've been out of the SV scene for a very long time now, but they still have a place in my heart. I just watched this review of the R7:


And with everything I learn about this bike, it makes me think about how one of the most common tropes on this forum back when I was active was "Suzuki needs to offer an SV-R alongside the S and N models!"

I don't mind saying that I'm finding it pretty hard to not go out and drop some money on an R7 until I remind myself that I'm old and fat with bad knees and no time to ride the bike I already do have. 😂
 
  • Like
Reactions: Jay V

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
7,104 Posts
Neat bike, but as he states - "The R7 is almost as aggressive (in seating/bar relationship) as the R6."

My son has an R6 that I've ridden enough to know that's too aggressive for me.

My SV still seems to check all the boxes for me. No plans to "upgrade" any time soon, but it's fun to look...
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
281 Posts
I checked an R7 out at the dealer a few weeks ago. No ride of course, but just setting on it, it felt amazingly like my S. Ergonomics were very much like how I have my bike set up. Clipons felt to be roughly the same height/width, pegs were pretty much spot on to where I have my rearsets at. I have my suspension worked, quick shifter, PC5 with dyno tune (making the power close to the same as the R7), so it feels to me like I would be forking $9k for a new version of what I already have.
In the end, if/when I get another bike, I'll probably skip the twins, out a few more $$, and go back to an inline 4.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
926 Posts
Discussion Starter · #27 ·
I checked an R7 out at the dealer a few weeks ago. No ride of course, but just setting on it, it felt amazingly like my S. Ergonomics were very much like how I have my bike set up. Clipons felt to be roughly the same height/width, pegs were pretty much spot on to where I have my rearsets at. I have my suspension worked, quick shifter, PC5 with dyno tune (making the power close to the same as the R7), so it feels to me like I would be forking $9k for a new version of what I already have.
In the end, if/when I get another bike, I'll probably skip the twins, out a few more $$, and go back to an inline 4.
It sure looks like an S model to me, too. Seat to pegs to clip-ons all look very familiar.
I think when the time comes for a new bike, I'll be looking at the R3 (or whatever else is in that category when I want something new). I've been tweaking this little Ninja 250 the last few months and I'm just liking the slow bikes more and more.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
7,104 Posts
It sure looks like an S model to me, too. Seat to pegs to clip-ons all look very familiar.
I think when the time comes for a new bike, I'll be looking at the R3 (or whatever else is in that category when I want something new). I've been tweaking this little Ninja 250 the last few months and I'm just liking the slow bikes more and more.
I really like the R3 for some reason as well.

The styling update a few years ago fixed a few of the visual issues I had with it, and the power would be adequate for me. My longtime riding buddy went from a Triumph Daytona 675 to a KTM RC390, and never looked back.

My oldest son rented a R3 on a trip to the LA area, and felt it made a pretty good street bike. He grew up on Ninja 250s, and ended up on a VFR800, so he knows what it's like to have plenty of power available.

No plans to sell the SV, but the R3 would most likely be my choice for a replacement.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
926 Posts
Discussion Starter · #29 ·
I fell into owning two bikes again last Summer, which I never wanted to repeat. I used to own half a dozen at any given time, then got it down to two a few years back. Once I sold the BMW and just had the SV it felt perfect. Then my Dad's old 250 showed up and they're so fun... Now that I have dumped a small bike budget into it while also maintaining and riding the SV I see the R3 as a way to potentially save time and money. SVs are worth a bit in today's market, and even Ninjettes are demanding a couple of grand now. When I see an R3 on craigslist for $4500, I gotta stop and think.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
486 Posts
I did one of my favorite twisty rides yesterday, Winters CA, to Lake Berryessa, to Napa on my wife's Z400. Its a blast riding that bike!! I did not feel I was at any disadvantage staying with other riders on bigger bikes. I can just imagine with better tires and suspension...
Regarding the R6 mentioned above. Two weeks ago in the same area I met someone on an R6 waiting for a tow truck. Rider said before engine stopped there was excessive vibration and lights going off on the dash. Said this was the second time he has had issues with the bike in just three months.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
926 Posts
Discussion Starter · #31 ·
Kawasaki has always made the best small sportbikes; I would go with the Ninja 400 just as much as the R3. I've had so many Kaws, but never a Yamaha... now that I think about it. Lots of Hondas too.
Was that a new R6? I've never heard of issues with the R6, they always seemed about as reliable as an anvil. They're dinosaurs though now; end of the line for the old I4 racebikes.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
486 Posts
Kawasaki has always made the best small sportbikes; I would go with the Ninja 400 just as much as the R3. I've had so many Kaws, but never a Yamaha... now that I think about it. Lots of Hondas too.
Was that a new R6? I've never heard of issues with the R6, they always seemed about as reliable as an anvil. They're dinosaurs though now; end of the line for the old I4 racebikes.
Meant Aprilia RS 660. It is a really beautiful bike, even nicer looking in person, too bad this brand has reliability issues.
One of the bike a want is the KTM 890 duke R. Came close to purchasing but after doing some research its the same sorry, reliability issues.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
281 Posts
Another alternative for a person wanting a "standard" type bike is the Triumph Street Triple. Mean little light weight 120HP naked bike. Full of gas barely over 400lbs, and no real reliability issues. Was looking at it when I checked out the R7, definitely a sweet bike if you want a regular handlebar..
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
365 Posts
Meant Aprilia RS 660. It is a really beautiful bike, even nicer looking in person, too bad this brand has reliability issues.
One of the bike a want is the KTM 890 duke R. Came close to purchasing but after doing some research its the same sorry, reliability issues.
The 660 engine seems OK thus far. Early on there was a batch of 700 bikes that were fitted with defective conrods from Aprilia's supplier but those bikes got replacement engines. That's all I've heard and I keep a pretty close eye on the Aprilia forum. I've only got 6,000km on mine so far but all's well. I'll keep ya's posted if it ends up being a lemon though lol.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,617 Posts
I'll say this: the brakes on most of these small bikes are not great, and the suspension on stuff like the R3 and Duke 390 are crap like what comes stock on the SV650. Even the base Street Triple and the lower-displacement Ducati Monsters have pretty sad suspension. IMO the R7 is a very significant departure from the rest of the market, with higher-spec suspension and brakes coupled with an accessible and low-power engine in a sporting package.
 
21 - 35 of 35 Posts
Top