Suzuki SV650 Riders Forum banner
1 - 20 of 35 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
500 Posts
This bike has been the centre of many discussions on local forums.
My personal opinion is that it's a dressed up version of an MT-07, with a somewhat steep price (although not yet disclosed it's rumored to be in the ballpark of 10K euros): this (again IMHO) doesn't make it a sport bike, at leas as much as a current Ninja 650 is not a sport bike but rather a dressed up version of the Z650, but these latter sell at a very reasonable price.

If I were to spend 10K euros on a middleweight (real) sport bike, I'd want at least a 90/100 HP engine with all the mechanical and electronic bells and whistles: let's be honest, 70ish HP you could get them 20 years ago with an SV650S; I'd expect something better today.
I'd probably steer into Aprilia RS660 direction, rather than Yamaha R7.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
292 Posts
Don't know how it will translate to Euro, but it lists for 8999USD here in the States.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
500 Posts
If the price tag will be in the ballpark of the Ninja 650, it will surely be interesting or at least comparable.
9k $ roughly equal 7400 €, and it is a great price.
Here locally the news were for slightly less that 10k €, that amount to slightly more than 12k $.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
292 Posts
Big difference with the R7 vs the Ninja 650 and the SV is the suspension. Actual useable, adjustable, suspension. Throw in the quick shifter, 180 tire, 414lbs wet weight, it's everything we spend a fortune on and pull our hair out swapping this and swapping that trying to turn the SV (don't know if the Ninja 650 people even bother with it on their bikes) into. Looks like a reasonable bang for the buck setup to me.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
500 Posts
I agree.
What I meant was that it all depends on the price it will be offered: if it is close, or at least not so distant, from what the Ninja 650 and others are offered, it's a blast for sure.
If the price is close to what an RS660 sells for, then I see no competition: Aprilia will get my vote hands down.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
7,105 Posts
I agree.
What I meant was that it all depends on the price it will be offered: if it is close, or at least not so distant, from what the Ninja 650 and others are offered, it's a blast for sure.
If the price is close to what an RS660 sells for, then I see no competition: Aprilia will get my vote hands down.
As MOHillbilly noted, the biggest difference may be quality and reliability.

I've not owned an Italian bike, but from all I've gathered the quality can be inconsistent with possible significant issues that are difficult to resolve.

Yamaha has a pretty strong rep for quality and durability, so most of that type of thing isn't a concern.
 

·
very big dumb
Joined
·
9,102 Posts
ive owned an aprilia and... no.
but what they did with the r7 is pretty much exactly what i wanted out of a suzuki for ages. so...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
928 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I agree with all that's being said here, and the comp to the rs660 is valid but having had a Euro bike previously I know that I can't honestly compare an Aprilia to a Yamaha on anything other than paper. At the end of the day, I have to live with the bike I buy.
I see this as the ultimate SV650 build. It's really what I've turned my own bike into over the years but it's slightly better in every way. No, it doesn't have 90 hp but I don't want 90 hp. I want 70-75 (that's why I ride an SV). As MO pointed out, this comes with the adjustability we all strive for when we buy shocks and cartridges for our SVs... maybe this isn't full on RR-level kit but I'm not a full on RR-level rider. I just want to get my sag right for my weight and my rebound right for my route.
Is it a dressed-up MT-07? Perhaps, but then we all ride dressed up SV650s ;)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
488 Posts
As MOHillbilly noted, the biggest difference may be quality and reliability.

I've not owned an Italian bike, but from all I've gathered the quality can be inconsistent with possible significant issues that are difficult to resolve.

Yamaha has a pretty strong rep for quality and durability, so most of that type of thing isn't a concern.
The Aprilia's are looking strong in the Twins Cup. There was a recent article by Sam Wiest, LWTracer and he mentioned holding off on purchase as there are some issues popping up with the RS660. Found the article however it looks like that comment was removed?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
42 Posts
I could definitely see one of these in my future. At first I was kind of shocked to see the comparison between the R7 vs. the R660 engine on paper; however, with the price differential and all of the suspension and other goodies that the R7 is getting vs. and FZ07, I'm really starting to lean towards the R7.

By the time that I'm actually looking though, I expect Suzuki will be at the party as well with whatever their next iteration of an SV650 is. I'm sure we'll be saying goodbye to V-Twins which is a real shame but just a product of the times.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
384 Posts
I could possibly see one of these in my future. I read one article on it and watched a few videos on it. I was fairly impressed with the specs on it. It could use a few more ponies though.
I was really hoping Yamaha would have done the MT09 first, naked bikes really aren't my thing.
In my opinion it is what the SV should have been 10-15 years ago.
 

·
very big dumb
Joined
·
9,102 Posts
got to demo ride an r7 on track. Slowly.
ok, so here's my summary. Unfortunately didnt turn any at pace laps so casual intro group speed. Bike feels more like an r3 than a big bike. Really "tiny" to the point where hopping back on my sv confused me with "why is it so big". Suspension and brakes are squishy... Obviously because street bike not track. So money needs to be spent on prep (not as much of an issue on say the r6 or r1 as both of those are decent enough for my pace). Ergos.. needs rearsets bad. But very short tank which is excellent. Power is... fz7/sv/whatever. No firebreathing monster. Pretty rev happy but not a neck snapper. All in all i think it will be a decent contender to svs and the like.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
500 Posts
Thanks for the test ride mad. (y)
Honestly, noone said the R7 wouldn't be a decent contender for the SV and the like, but ... after 22 years I would've expected something better, especially if it is offered at a higher price than the like.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
384 Posts
got to demo ride an r7 on track. Slowly.
ok, so here's my summary. Unfortunately didnt turn any at pace laps so casual intro group speed. Bike feels more like an r3 than a big bike. Really "tiny" to the point where hopping back on my sv confused me with "why is it so big". Suspension and brakes are squishy... Obviously because street bike not track. So money needs to be spent on prep (not as much of an issue on say the r6 or r1 as both of those are decent enough for my pace). Ergos.. needs rearsets bad. But very short tank which is excellent. Power is... fz7/sv/whatever. No firebreathing monster. Pretty rev happy but not a neck snapper. All in all i think it will be a decent contender to svs and the like.

Thanks for the review. I suspect that the suspension was not set up for you hence the squishy feeling. Keep in mind it is a budget suspension. The both forks you can adjust preload, one fork is compression adjustable and the other is rebound adjustable. The rear shock is preload and rebound adjustable. The brakes probably felt squishy due to having rubber brake hoses instead of braided stainless steel hoses.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
928 Posts
Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Wow, a 700cc bike that feels like an R3 sounds like the ticket. I'm not a short guy and I like being comfortable, but even at 6'+ I can appreciate hucking around little dirt bikes, ninjettes, pitbikes etc. For a go-fast bike, the R3 is a great fun option. Give it equivalent power to my SV? Now we're talking.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13 Posts
got to demo ride an r7 on track. Slowly.
ok, so here's my summary. Unfortunately didnt turn any at pace laps so casual intro group speed. Bike feels more like an r3 than a big bike. Really "tiny" to the point where hopping back on my sv confused me with "why is it so big". Suspension and brakes are squishy... Obviously because street bike not track. So money needs to be spent on prep (not as much of an issue on say the r6 or r1 as both of those are decent enough for my pace). Ergos.. needs rearsets bad. But very short tank which is excellent. Power is... fz7/sv/whatever. No firebreathing monster. Pretty rev happy but not a neck snapper. All in all i think it will be a decent contender to svs and the like.
Yeh hard pass over here in Australia I think. Based on early accounts the R7 is not 50% more bike that an SV but they want AUD 15k for the R7 and AUD 10k for the SV650
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
488 Posts
As MOHillbilly noted, the biggest difference may be quality and reliability.

I've not owned an Italian bike, but from all I've gathered the quality can be inconsistent with possible significant issues that are difficult to resolve.

Yamaha has a pretty strong rep for quality and durability, so most of that type of thing isn't a concern.
I've been hearing lots of rumors regarding the RS 660 and reliability issues.
Just one of the reasons I stay with Japanese bikes.

and

"I know that answer is frustratingly unclear, but there is a good reason for that, as I would be remiss in my journalistic duties if I didn’t disclose a series of issues that we had on the Aprilia RS 660 during our test ride.
The bikes on review were pre-production models, and before we turned a wheel, Aprilia disclosed to us that some minor issues with the fueling and calibration were still being ironed out on these bikes back in Noale.
Virtually all of the machines on our launch had intermittent issues with ABS lights flickering constantly. My model also threw out a “check engine” light at the beginning of our ride, which wouldn’t clear on a full key restart.
Making matters worse, my particular Aprilia RS 660 (the second one off the assembly line, by the way), suffered from being hard to start when the motor was hot.
The real icing on the cake was when the bike shutdown completely while at speed, not once, but twice on our ride on California’s Highway 33.
As good as a motorcycle can be in every other regard, it is hard to recommend a machine to a reader when it has the above issues, and we can only review the motorcycle that is presented to us – not the manufacturer’s future intentions."
 
1 - 20 of 35 Posts
Top