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Discussion Starter #1
(I bought a new 2003 N model back in 2003, but it burned in a fire in 2018.)

Can someone who maybe had the older model offer a quick comparison/contrast?
I know the aluminum frame is gone & they went to dual-plug heads years ago.

But is the handling as good now, better?
Does the newer model still allow pretty much bolt-up of GSXR shocks? (My 03 only
needed slight trimming of the underseat/battery plastic.)
Is vibration level less, more, same?
Is the general feel better?

I also noticed the forum technical sections seem to only go up to 2015. Why is that?

I'm sure that if I spent a long day reading the forum, I could come up with the answers for myself,
so I confess that I'm a BIT lazy, and I don't think doing so would give me as much perspective as
someone who has "lived" here in recent model years. But I am VERY thankful for anybody's efforts.

Wait. I can contribute something here. I bought a 2018 GSX-S 1000 and the stock suspension sucked
bigtime for my 145 lbs. I could not charge into corners anywhere near how I could on my SV.
I spent about $900 on a shock and that end still sucks. Spring is too stiff.
But I did the Traxxion cartridge replacements so that is way better than anything I've experienced.
Were I to do it over again, I would not have bought the GSX-S. I hope this helps.
 

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My (fully adjustable) stock suspended ZRX1100 handles pretty well since I've gotten all the settings dialed in, but my Olins'd and cartridged '01 SVN is in a completely different realm. I doubt you'll ever get that big 'Zuk to handle as well as an SV. As to as which SV generation is best I've only ridden the one I have. I do know it's some 30 pounds lighter than the current one though.
 

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I've had a 2017 Gen 3 (with ABS, purchased used with 1,600 miles) for nearly a year and 10K miles, here are my thoughts on it compared with my previous K6S (half-fairing).

Engine: we all love the SV engine, and Suzuki has managed to improve it still further for the Gen 3. It's smoother and seems even punchier. Throttle response is still sharp and instant in any gear, at any speed. The torque peak has moved higher up the rev range but it doesn't feel that way - crack the throttle at 4,000 rpm in 6th and the bike still pulls like a frisky pitbull. Even though the dash now has a gear indicator, I've still tried to change to 7th a few times :vroom:

Interestingly, checking the factory specs, all the internal gear ratios are identical to the K3 onward bikes, and the final drive is the same as K3-onward nakeds (45T rear sprocket). It's definitely more economical - I get 70mpg (Imperial gallon = 4.546 litres) compared to 55mpg from the K6S in exactly the same type of riding.

Handling: the frame geometry is different, it's the old Gladius frame, so the AL7's handling is much livelier and turns in more easily than older SVs (obviously helped by the higher / wider bars). But it feels just as planted once it's in the corner, and the forks are MILES better. Firmer but still compliant, and no clonking! The rear end is completely unobtrusive, it just does its job without twitching, bouncing etc.

Brakes: frankly, not as good as my old K6. They stop the bike just fine, but the initial bite and feel isn't there. I could squeal the front tyre with two fingers on my K6: the AL7 needs three fingers to get the same level of braking. The calipers and discs are identical, so I can only assume it's the lengthy ABS plumbing which has reduced the feel. I got used to the (lack of) feel of the new brakes in a few miles.

Ergonomics: many people criticise the seat for being too thin / too tilted forward. For my @ss, it's fine - better than the factory gel seat on my K6. Yes, it IS thinly padded, but because it's wide & flat, I'm happy for 2 to 3 hours at a time with no problems. Your @ss may vary ;D

The new dash is busy and has lots of toys (fuel range, instant MPG, average MPG etc etc) but it's easy to get the info you need, and it's easy to read quickly even in bright sunlight. I would prefer a dial revcounter but the 'bar' readout is OK. The revised clutch actuator makes the clutch action much better, and the 'low rpm assist' is completely unobtrusive. You only notice it if you try to notice it, which is as it should be.

In conclusion, I wasn't looking to replace my K6, I was very happy with it - but it got totalled so I had no choice. But the Gen 3 is really is a better bike in pretty much every department and I don't miss the K6.
 

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According to the road test reviews I read before buying my '19, they improved the brakes for the '18 model year.
 

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According to the road test reviews I read before buying my '19, they improved the brakes for the '18 model year.
Yep, the latest bikes have 4-piston front calipers replacing the 2-piston Tokicos which have been on SVs since '99 ...
 

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@Craig380 Good info, cheers. I've just bought a brand new Gen 3 to turn into a racer to replace my aging Gen 2 racer. I haven't received the bike yet though. I had a ride on a Gen 3 (admittedly with aftermarket suspension etc) at the track recently and was very impressed. Didnt feel quiet as punchy as my Gen 2 off the bottom but better in all other respects. The worst aspect of my Gen 2 despite braided lines and race pads is the brakes. The Gen 3 I rode was a 19 model with the 4 piston calipers and it was two finger operation. You just reminded me I will need to fit direct lines up front to bypass the ABS.
 

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I think Craig 380 nailed it. I had a 2006n and now have a 2017 non-abs. Problem is I owned them 5 years and 5 bikes apart, with my last bike being a Griso 8V (Brembo everything, fully adjustable suspension, 80 lbs/ft of torque, and not nearly as much fun as the SV).

The current SV engine feels about like the one I loved in my k6. People say the new one has more power but the improvements, with the exception of a drastic fuel efficiency upgrade, are slight. Suspension is where Suzuki stepped up their game and finally got it right. The current SV has a well set up damper rod, the right spring rates, and the right oil. Gone is the bottoming out and soft feeling in the front. Brakes are the one area where I think the SV is somehow worse, at least until the change was made to a 4 piston set-up. My 2017 felt like it required a lot more lever force to stop a little more quickly, a problem my '06 didn't have. $150 on a used radial R6 master cylinder and good brake pads has fixed the issue. Now my brakes are perfectly fine. They aren't amazing, they aren't great, but they are good.
 
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