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I always get piled on in forums when I suggest that there is such a thing as mechanical aptitude and the message that's common in these places that anyone can be a mechanic is just wrong. They put a bend in exhaust to clear access for the plug. It's not hard to get in or out. I used to do work for a friend on his bike because he had no aptitude. I let him help, once and that almost ended up in a wreck. Here a well meaning person without the requisite skill tried to save himself $50 and it may cost him thousands to fix it.


... I’m not sure this is very helpful, the OP has to learn somehow and we have all made mistakes.


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I see what you are saying, snail, but any oil leak from the drain plug will drip in-line with the rear tire. I would not want that on my mind while canyon carving.

Heat cycles and vibration will not be kind to an epoxy metal bond.
It's designed to have a very similar thermal expansion rate as aluminum. If you can get any meaningful amount of unpressurized oil past epoxied threads, I will be impressed. I haven't used the stuff extensively over the years, but I've also seen it on several occasions on others' drivetrain parts. It held the exhaust bolts (with helicoils) on my aluminum VW boxer for 5+ years before I sold it. It also filled pits in those same heads, allowing me to file them flat and get a good seal with the head gaskets. Heat is NOT a concern.

Having dealt with getting cast aluminum engine casings welded (Briggs vertical shaft twin cyl) welded, I can tell you from experience that's not as wonderful a solution as everyone is imagining.

You will have a stress boundary due to the difference in metallurgy....cast and welded have different properties. It will distort the case slightly, although in this location that's probably not as big a deal.

While it can be done, you also carry risk of damaging nearby seals and gaskets, as well as internal arcing that can damage or seize parts together. All flammable liquids will need to be flushed out, and the bike or engine will need to be on its side or upside down. There is a very real risk of burning some residual oil inside.

I also think it's worth a shot taking it to Suzuki.... everyone is quick to blame the op, but to me the only way this looks possible is a casting defect. I don't think the aluminum should have cracked before stripping threads, and it doesn't look like he hit it hard enough to crack it either.
 

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I’d go to a welder and have the whole thing welded closed. Then drain the oil from another sight. You could also have it welded closed, pull the clutch cover and pile rags into the pan section, re drill the drain hole, using rags to stop migration of metal particles. Re tap the hole the same way. Grind/file/sand the surface on the outside of the hole flat, giving a mating surface for the plug. Use Teflon tape or Teflon thread sealer liberally, and it should hold reliably. Someone mentioned another hole that could be used for draining the oil. I’d be looking at that, and using a torque wrench. If Suzuki or the dealer fixes this as a warranty or good faith warranty, I’d be surprised. I’ve found Suzuki to be not very warranty accommodating over the years. However, I have never personally had any issues with Albany of the Suzuki’s I’ve owned over the years. Once you put your tools to something, they love to blame improper maintenance technique, instead of any true defect. Good luck to the OP, there is a solution that does not require new cases and thousands of dollars. It’ll take some effort though.
 

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Discussion Starter #24
Thank you all for the replies I appreciate it, I just went on vacation from my job and ima go in person to the dealer tomorrow I actually called them the day after this happend but was denied a warranty claim as I was at fault but I will try again before going the welding route like you guys have suggested. Thanks a ton for the help!
 

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... I’m not sure this is very helpful, the OP has to learn somehow and we have all made mistakes.


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It's not popular but advising someone with minimal mechanical aptitude not to mess around with his bikes and cars can actually be helpful and save money and injuries later.
 

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It's not popular but advising someone with minimal mechanical aptitude not to mess around with his bikes and cars can actually be helpful and save money and injuries later.


... it is not popular because it is pompous!


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It's not popular but advising someone with minimal mechanical aptitude not to mess around with his bikes and cars can actually be helpful and save money and injuries later.
What makes you qualified to decide who gets to work on a car or bike? Are you one of those perfect people that has never had anything go wrong during maintenance or repairs?
 

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Thank you all for the replies I appreciate it, I just went on vacation from my job and ima go in person to the dealer tomorrow I actually called them the day after this happend but was denied a warranty claim as I was at fault but I will try again before going the welding route like you guys have suggested. Thanks a ton for the help!


Good fortune. Let us know how you get on.
Best wishes,
Alan


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What makes you qualified to decide who gets to work on a car or bike? Are you one of those perfect people that has never had anything go wrong during maintenance or repairs?
Not specifically on cars or bikes but I spent an entire career in the business of repairing and maintaining complicated machinery, some of which could kill you. For most of that time I was responsible for hiring the crews. It was my job to decide who was qualified and who wasn't. It really wasn't that hard. People that insist that everyone has the same aptitudes and anyone can learn anything are just plain wrong. Encouraging literally everyone to do their own repairs and maintenance can cost a lot of money and get people actually killed. I don't mean to be mean to the OP. I can tell you that I have certainly made mistakes. I haven't ever done major damage to an engine by changing its oil. I have seen others seize the engine in a brand new truck by changing the oil. Some people should let others maintain their vehicles. That's not pomposity, it's reality.
 

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Not specifically on cars or bikes but I spent an entire career in the business of repairing and maintaining complicated machinery, some of which could kill you. For most of that time I was responsible for hiring the crews. It was my job to decide who was qualified and who wasn't. It really wasn't that hard. People that insist that everyone has the same aptitudes and anyone can learn anything are just plain wrong. Encouraging literally everyone to do their own repairs and maintenance can cost a lot of money and get people actually killed. I don't mean to be mean to the OP. I can tell you that I have certainly made mistakes. I haven't ever done major damage to an engine by changing its oil. I have seen others seize the engine in a brand new truck by changing the oil. Some people should let others maintain their vehicles. That's not pomposity, it's reality.
Ahh, so a casting cracking means someone should never touch a wrench again. You sure do assume a lot from a couple of sentences the OP wrote. Sounds like you made up your mind based on almost nothing, and are weaving in elements of people you have encountered in real life and superimposing those onto the OP.

Go count some beans, or manage something, or whatever it is you do...since you clearly have no intention of offering a solution to the actual problem, which is how to repair a damaged casting. This is not a "people problem" but a technical one.
 

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Not strictly related to the OP question, but my experience is that everybody can learn almost everything (and certainly the basics) provided they get proper teaching and they have a "learning" attitude (i.e. being interested in learning).
I have experienced this in several fields (mechanics, aeronautics, shooting and several highly dinamic sports) where I have been both a learner and an instructor.

Of course, if you plan on DIY something you've never learned or done before, without guidance, you better have some definite skills or the scr€w factor is very high.
 

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Be willing to learn, but know your limitations.

You need to weigh your current skills with what is required, and after doing some research, decide if you think you are able to complete the task successfully.

Knowing when you are over your head is the key.
 

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I normally wouldn’t recommend JB weld as some others have here but based on where it broke if Suzuki doesn’t do a fix for you, JB Weld would probably serve you well. The section that broke, based on your pictures, does not look like it’s touching the oil in the sump and would not be exposing the oil in your sump to the JB weld. It’s pretty clear it’s not a section that’s exposed to the oil in your sump because the broken piece you are holding isn’t wet with oil. I really don’t think you’re screwed at all other than resale value as I’m sure most people would be wary about buying a bike with a broken/cracked oil drain.
That’s my 2 cents. Good luck. Oh and make sure to use torque/socket wrenches going forward. It’s been a while since I looked at my manual but I’m pretty sure the torque spec is listed for the oil drain plug.
 

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JB "weld" is still glue. It is possible it could last the life of the bike but there will always be the psychological burden thinking this may be the week it starts dripping oil on the rear tire.
 

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Have you ever actually used it?
Yes. It is a good product. The first time I saw it, like 50 years ago lol, was at the hardware store display with the golf ball glued to the Coke bottle. :) Feel it with your thumb, try to dig your finger nail into it, impressive!

Recently, I used it on the FuelBot2.0 (SV650 fuel gague) to hold the glass to the ABS case. I tested it at 12 ft deep in the swimming pool also submerged overnight in water, it held fine. But after a year or so I got a few emails about glue joint failure and water intrusion. The failure was my fault not the JB weld. I should have temp-cycled the joint (freezer/hot water) to be sure it would hold. A vibe test would have been worthwhile too.

I take your word for it that there is a JB weld (they make many varieties) with thermal expansion matched to aluminum but a first hit for google shows aluminum coefficient at 13.7 vs JB weld at 50.

I am not saying JB weld will not hold in this case. I really do not know. I do know that a TIG weld, even an ugly one, would be forever.

For me the decision is peace of mind.
 

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I’d go to a welder and have the whole thing welded closed. Then drain the oil from another sight. You could also have it welded closed, pull the clutch cover and pile rags into the pan section, re drill the drain hole, using rags to stop migration of metal particles. Re tap the hole the same way. Grind/file/sand the surface on the outside of the hole flat, giving a mating surface for the plug. Use Teflon tape or Teflon thread sealer liberally, and it should hold reliably. Someone mentioned another hole that could be used for draining the oil. I’d be looking at that, and using a torque wrench. If Suzuki or the dealer fixes this as a warranty or good faith warranty, I’d be surprised. I’ve found Suzuki to be not very warranty accommodating over the years. However, I have never personally had any issues with Albany of the Suzuki’s I’ve owned over the years. Once you put your tools to something, they love to blame improper maintenance technique, instead of any true defect. Good luck to the OP, there is a solution that does not require new cases and thousands of dollars. It’ll take some effort though.
This is the direction I would go...………

Heck, I would bet you could change the oil filter every 1000 or so miles and top off with fresh oil and never have an oil related issue.
 

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Yes. It is a good product. The first time I saw it, like 50 years ago lol, was at the hardware store display with the golf ball glued to the Coke bottle. :) Feel it with your thumb, try to dig your finger nail into it, impressive!

Recently, I used it on the FuelBot2.0 (SV650 fuel gague) to hold the glass to the ABS case. I tested it at 12 ft deep in the swimming pool also submerged overnight in water, it held fine. But after a year or so I got a few emails about glue joint failure and water intrusion. The failure was my fault not the JB weld. I should have temp-cycled the joint (freezer/hot water) to be sure it would hold. A vibe test would have been worthwhile too.

I take your word for it that there is a JB weld (they make many varieties) with thermal expansion matched to aluminum but a first hit for google shows aluminum coefficient at 13.7 vs JB weld at 50.

I am not saying JB weld will not hold in this case. I really do not know. I do know that a TIG weld, even an ugly one, would be forever.

For me the decision is peace of mind.
I think you know I meant, have you used it in a similar application as this thread (an engine block, transmission housing, differential, etc.). I have, and with great success I might add.

Also, I don't know if ABS falls into this category, but I know it's not recommended for certain types of plastics, as it doesn't bond/adhere to that.

In any case, this use case isn't really as an adhesive between two flat surfaces, it's a gap filler.
 

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Glad you had good success, snail. I am just offering my opinion in this case, for whatever it is worth. Good luck to all.
 
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