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I'm a pretty noob rider only had a grom but now I've put 600 miles into a brand new Sv650 so I do the oil filter and oil change like the manual says but as I screwed in the Oil plug i broke a piece and now I'm leaking

Summary - Broke a piece of the Crank Case now so what are my options

I have warranty but I will be at fault so I wont be covered, it is strange how the exhaust pipe was in the way so I had to angle the Oil plug to get it in there but it resulted in me breaking a piece
 

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BIG TIME SCREWED...…………..the SV doesn't have a oil pan. You'll have to replace to crankcase to fix it right. JB Weld?
 

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Yep, JB or a replacement engine from a crasher. From my understanding the case halves are machined in pairs and must be replaced as a set, but in doing so you'd be faced with the challenge of building an engine. There's likely to be some sort of 3rd world welding approach where metal could be added and the threads re-cut, but I don't know how you'd find somebody with that particular set of skills, or if it would even be feasible without disassembly, or what you would end up having when you are done. If there are enough threads left in the case, JB Weld might be worth a shot in that it's cheap, otherwise it seems to me your best approach would be to part it out on Ebay. Lots of work, but probably your best chance of recouping your investment.

Bummer dude.
 

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Gosh, what a calamity- you must have used a huge amount of force to do that.

I don’t think JB Weld would be strong enough, but how about taking it to a professional welder and having the lump welded back on (maybe using the sump bolt as a guide), then re-tapping (maybe using a helicoil insert) the thread in situ? It maybe only has a 50:50 chance of working, but you don’t really have another option short of re-building the whole engine. It might be worth a go, at least speak with a professional welder to get an opinion.

Good fortune,

Alan


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yeah that's a case swap (whole motor swap really since splitting cases costs like a used motor in labor). couple grand either way. and no if you screwed up changing the oil, it's not something you can diy
 

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I would start by taking the bike to your Suzuki dealer if it’s still warranty the dealership can ask for a goodwill claim I work for Kawasaki for 15 years and we paid those types of repair all the time the customer goes to the dealer and say they made a mistake you’re trying to do the right thing by changing your oil you made a mistake you’re a newbie the mechanic the service department at your dealership can formally asked for a goodwill repair and most likely nine out of 10 times Suzuki will pay for those types of repair if it’s done at the dealer and the request is done within warranty. I would strongly try this approach as it will cost you nothing .
 

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... I’m coming to think that welding the lump back on in situ would probably work. You could probably find a mobile welder that can fix aluminium who could come to your house.

Strip off the exhaust for good access and drain the oil, the welding itself should not be too difficult and it will not matter if it is a bit messy as long as the guy achieves a good penetration, it can be dressed later with a hand file. Then run an original size tap through the existing hole - you might just get lucky and the threads might line up well enough. That probably won’t work (but it is worth a try) so the next thing to do would be to drill the hole a little larger (with a hand held drill - using the original alignment as a guide) and tap that for a bigger bolt. Be careful to vacuum up the swarf as you go, and flush the engine through (with oil and kerosine mix) before you fit the new plug and re-fill with oil.

I think there is a pretty good chance of that working (much better than the 50:50 I thought originally). If it doesn’t you could have the bolt hole welded up completely with a plug, and then drain the oil via the other bolt suggested above.

I think one of these three progressive options will almost certainly work. Unfortunately you will have reduced the value of your SV650 very considerably (I wouldn’t but a bike with a welded crankcase for more than 50 cents on the dollar), but I think you could still enjoy the bike for many years to come.

Let us know how you get on.

Alan


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Anytime any type of patching welding to the crank case is definitely the wrong way to go if you ever have a failure the crankcase go through heat cycle every time you run heat up your bike cool your bike and if you ever have a failure of that weld while you’re riding much more than devaluating your bike is on the line get it fixed properly and change the crank case that’s the only way to do things! any other repair is completely stupid because you’re risking your life over a piece of JB weld crankcase are not that hard to change the job can be done in one day And I’m sure if you call Suzuki and tell him what you do they might even send you the part for free go that route first trust me
 

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I would start by taking the bike to your Suzuki dealer if it’s still warranty the dealership can ask for a goodwill claim I work for Kawasaki for 15 years and we paid those types of repair all the time the customer goes to the dealer and say they made a mistake you’re trying to do the right thing by changing your oil you made a mistake you’re a newbie the mechanic the service department at your dealership can formally asked for a goodwill repair and most likely nine out of 10 times Suzuki will pay for those types of repair if it’s done at the dealer and the request is done within warranty. I would strongly try this approach as it will cost you nothing .


... that is a really good idea, and worth a go - do this before you have a welder try a repair.


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Sorry that happened, it is a shame, only 600 miles on the engine.

As mentioned, definitely ask the dealer first. If you try any repair before going to the dealer they will dismiss warranty coverage out-of-hand.

It could be a casting defect since it broke on the very first oil change. That is what I would argue.

If warranty is denied, I would replace the steel bolt with aluminum (available at McMaster-Carr) and have the drain permanently welded shut. You can use #20 plug below for future oil changes.


A competent TIG welder should be able to do the job. The biggest risk is encountering a less skilled welder who might totally screw it up.

I would take photos to as many welders as possible, go in person so you can size up the welder and get a look at the shop. You do not want some yokel doing the job. If the welder talks about oil contamination at the weld site being a problem that is a good sign as it means he is aware and will takes steps to avoid it.

If you make it that far, drain the fuel tank, be prepared to have the bike laid on its side to give the welder best access.

As Othen and Emmanuel said, JB weld is a bad bad idea.

Good luck to you, please let us know how this turns out.
 

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Sorry that happened, it is a shame, only 600 miles on the engine.

As mentioned, definitely ask the dealer first. If you try any repair before going to the dealer they will dismiss warranty coverage out-of-hand.

It could be a casting defect since it broke on the very first oil change. That is what I would argue.

If warranty is denied, I would replace the steel bolt with aluminum (available at McMaster-Carr) and have the drain permanently welded shut. You can use #20 plug below for future oil changes.


A competent TIG welder should be able to do the job. The biggest risk is encountering a less skilled welder who might totally screw it up.

I would take photos to as many welders as possible, go in person so you can size up the welder and get a look at the shop. You do not want some yokel doing the job. If the welder talks about oil contamination at the weld site being a problem that is a good sign as it means he is aware and will takes steps to avoid it.

If you make it that far, drain the fuel tank, be prepared to have the bike laid on its side to give the welder best access.

As Othen and Emmanuel said, JB weld is a bad bad idea.

Good luck to you, please let us know how this turns out.


... now that was a good reply OP - see, all is not lost.

If the warranty doesn’t work then I think we are converging on a welded plug solution. I would see no reason why you wouldn’t run the bike for 15 years and 100,000 miles like that.

Good fortune, let us know how you get on.

Alan


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Do you have comprehensive insurance? Leave it overnight in a mall parking lot for a week and hope it get's stolen.
 

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I always get piled on in forums when I suggest that there is such a thing as mechanical aptitude and the message that's common in these places that anyone can be a mechanic is just wrong. They put a bend in exhaust to clear access for the plug. It's not hard to get in or out. I used to do work for a friend on his bike because he had no aptitude. I let him help, once and that almost ended up in a wreck. Here a well meaning person without the requisite skill tried to save himself $50 and it may cost him thousands to fix it.
 

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I would say weld it. Its not really hard. I used to have an auto shop and we got lots of broken bolts in blocks and broken brackets that people broke. We purchased two different welders a Mig and a stick/arc welder. Big thing is to use the proper welding rods. If you find a guy who knows what he is doing. I see no reason why the repair wont last a life of the engine. The location and easy access to the drain should be a 20 min job or so. Compare to what we used to get with zero access where we had to take things apart just to get to it. Be ready to pay a min of one hour worth of labor. We had a min of one hour labor even if it was a 20 min job.


Just remember there is no pressure in the crank so no reason to tighten the bold so much. It just to hold the thick oil in the crankcase
I would say don't go over 20lb of torque max.
Do not use JB weld or anything else to try and repair it. ONLY welding.
 

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I would definitely run it by the dealer. Even if you potentially did something wrong, it may be bad metallurgy. Don't automatically assume or admit you did it. Clearly in normal use that shouldn't just snap off.
 

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If I were tryin to save a bunch of money. Drain the oil. Weld it closed. Then drill and tap a different hole. Doesnt necessarily have to be the same size hole either.
 

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I would JB weld the bolt in there permanently, assuming there are enough threads to hold the bolt, and use the other bolt for future oil changes.

This is not a structural bolt, just squeezes a washer to prevent leaks.

Put either RTV or jb weld on both sides of the crush gasket, then put jb weld on the bolt threads, thread it in snug but not too tight, and fill the remaining gap with jb weld (the last bit is just cosmetic).

If you seal the threads, it won't leak or back out, even with minimal torque on the bolt.
 

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I see what you are saying, snail, but any oil leak from the drain plug will drip in-line with the rear tire. I would not want that on my mind while canyon carving.

Heat cycles and vibration will not be kind to an epoxy metal bond.
 

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This thread is running and running ... there is some good advice emerging (apart from the JB weld ones, they sound a bit bogus). What it is missing is the OP though - after a good opening post with some nice photos he/she has been rather conspicuous by his/her absence.

I do hope the OP comes back to let us know an outcome.

Good fortune,

Alan


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