Suzuki SV650 Riders Forum banner

1 - 20 of 35 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
23 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm hopeful that this post can serve two purposes. First, being a most-inclusive list of common mods and where to find more information about them, and second as a way to finalize my shopping list for my upcoming modding extravaganza.

I'll keep this maintained as well as I can with any information you provide in this thread or as I scan through the forum myself for answers.

Here is a list of the mods that I intend to make either ASAP, very soon, soon or would be a 'nice to have' but aren't priorities (postpone.)

I'd like comments on everything from which mods that offer a noticeable gain that aren't on the list or anything that is on the list and possibly shouldn't be due to a negligible benefit to which product in each category I should choose, or what the benefits of each are if there are multiple options.

My bike is a 2008 SV650AS stock (currently) - I am 6'2", and between 205-210lbs, so the stock shocks are likely not adequate. I've never driven/ridden any other street bike, so I have no frame of reference here, but from what I gather, the stock shocks are made for someone around 135lbs. I also have size 15 feet, so I presume the levers/pedals should be adjusted for proper riding position.

I've had my bike for 4 years when I bought it off the showroom floor, it currently has 1,500 miles on it, and was serviced last month.

Without further ado, here is the list of the mods I'm considering, and the info I have about them, please let me know if you can fill any gaps or have opinions on why one product is better than the other and under what circumstances:

ASAP Mods
TPS Mod - free - Learn More

R6 throttle tube - $? - Learn more (Learn More)
* Is this the proper item?

Adjusting stock damper/compression - free
It seems the consensus is that this won't provide much benefit, the only way to really get proper suspension is to replace the shocks and forks. Is this correct?

More information on adjustments:
http://www.sportrider.com/tech/146_9508_technicalities_suspension_springs/index.html

Heavier weight fork oil - variable
15W for stock springs, I believe.
If using better springs, 20W is recommended

Ensure control levers and pedals are properly adjusted to fit my build - free
Gear Lever
You can adjust the position of the gear lever by adjusting the gear shift rod (part 29 on the fiche)
Slacken off the locking nuts at either end and then rotate it (one of the ends is a left handed thread so it increases / decreases the effective length) and when you have the gear lever in the position you want it, do the lock nuts back up <-- do not forget to do this! (source)
(pic)
Front brake lever
Instructions
Back break lever
Thread
Clutch Lever
Instructions

Bar end mirrors - variable
Which brand is most preferred? Napolean?

Ensure proper tire pressure - free
I've seen the suggestion for 37F 40B for general driving, and bump up the PSI by two if you're going to be going for a longer ride

aTRE - $27 - from 92westshady's thread

MotoSliders - $129-179
I also opted-in for swing arm sliders
- Product Link

New Headlamps - variable
I've only seen Osram Nightbreaker H4 bulbs mentioned, what other popular options are there?
* Is this the right item?


Spray paint interior of windscreen flat black - $?
Is there any particular type/brand? I've heard Krylon Fusion mentioned.

Very Soon mods:
Spark plugs - variable
If I'm not noticing any problems with my current spark plugs, does it make sense to 'upgrade'?
I've heard Denso IU24 Iridium are good.
New Tires - variable
120/70/17 front
160/60/17 rear
What are the respective strengths and weaknesses of these common suggestions?
Michelin Pilot Road 2
Michelin Pilot Road 3
Dunlop Roadsmarts
Pirelli Angel ST

Get aftermarket shocks - variable
Bear in mind, I weigh 205-210lbs.

Stock: 430 lbs/inch - 7.697 kg/mm
Recommended for my weight:
525 lbs/inch - 9.40 kg/mm

I've seen a few mentioned, but I have no idea how to judge them, any pointers?


Get aftermarket forks - variable
Stock: 0.670 kg/mm
Recommended for my weight: 0.95 kg/mm

Same story as shocks, pretty in the dark as to how to choose.

Get aftermarket seat - variable
I think the only way I'm going to figure this one out is by sitting on the different seats availalable, but not sure how I can pull that off, I don't know of any places that have a wide selection of bikes near me (grants pass, southern oregon)

Soon Mods:
High flow air filter - variable
K&N seem to be the popular choice - here's a seemingly happy customer

Fender eliminator - variable
There seem to be a lot here

New horn - variable
I think the stock horn is way too... immasculating. I want something that more accurately repesents the bike. Any suggestions there? Here are some I found in a thread about horns:
Fiamm Freeway Blaster
Stebel Nautilus
Stebel air horn

Heated grips - variable
Symtec seems to be the go-to brand here

Postpone:
Exhaust slip-on
Putting this one off only because the cost, the M4 costs $289-$399 -- does is offer much/any of a performance boost, or is it all about the sound? (Don't get me wrong, I want it to sound better, but $499 is a bit steep to pay for it atm)
Stainless steel brake lines - variable
I haven't found any good information on what the benefits are here. Can someone point me in the right direction?
Desnorkel air box
I've read that desnorkeling a Gen II will just add noise, not power, so not going to do this mod.
Would it be beneficial to get a SV1K snorkel?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
149 Posts
You've had your bike for 4 years, and only have 1,500 miles on it?! are you sure its not 15,000?! Do you live in Alaska or something where it never stops snowing? or maybe you don't have roads around you? Good lord 1,500 miles on it?! that's like a "light" riding season!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,510 Posts
( Edit~ ha j got in right before me. ;) )

1,500 miles? In FOUR years?

My advice? Just ride man. Really. I just started riding a few months ago and I've ridden twice that.

I understand wanting to mod and spend money. Maybe you are better off investing the money in yourself via trackdays, schools, msf courses and the like.

Good luck.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
857 Posts
Actually ride for a while, then decide what you need. For the amount of riding you do, none of that will even be that helpful, much less necessary. The only thing you might need to worry about is getting new tires because the old ones are so, well, old.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,180 Posts
I think I did 1,500 miles last month... ;)

I save most mods for winter when I can't ride.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
832 Posts
Consider riding other bikes before you dump a bunch of money into your SV. No sense dropping the cash to later find out you like I4 bikes.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I wonder how different replies would be if I hadn't mentioned that the bike only have 1,500 miles on it ;)

I've been exceptionally busy with personal and professional issues for about 3 and a half years, 500+ of those 1,500 miles are from the last few months, and I plan to ride a lot more, I've been able to get in at least one ride per week, which has been awesome.

I'm still going to be making the mods, as I want to further my enjoyment of riding by having a quality ride. I love my SV650, and plan to keep it for at least 5 more years, though I have no plans to get rid of it.

Any suggestions/opinions on any of the items listed in my post, aside from how many miles are on my bike? :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Change the tires and do the basic suspension setup. Chance the springs and oil to match your weight.

Ride for another 2000 miles with that then see what the next thing you would want to change.
I've got those on my list, and I plan to change them, I'm currently looking for pointers (I couldn't find much information that compiled the different options and showed what their pros/cons are) - which tires? I'm thinking PR3's currently, as per the suggestion of a few, but I'd rather have some data to guide my opinion. Which shocks? I'm not well versed on the different options, especially as it concerns different weights.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
6,015 Posts
I've got those on my list, and I plan to change them, I'm currently looking for pointers (I couldn't find much information that compiled the different options and showed what their pros/cons are) - which tires? I'm thinking PR3's currently, as per the suggestion of a few, but I'd rather have some data to guide my opinion. Which shocks? I'm not well versed on the different options, especially as it concerns different weights.
Here is a chart for comparing the sport bike tires from michelin


For springs and oil, I would check out Sonic Springs. You can give them your weight and riding style and they can set you up with the right front setup for you. This would be the cheap and quick way.

Rear you can do a swap with other rear shocks or go with a aftermarket like penske or ohlins.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 · (Edited)
Excellent information, thank you.

I don't see the PR3 in there, is there a significant difference between the PR3 and PR2?

Edit: It appears that the PR3 is better at handling wet terrain, but the PR2 is preferred by some for dry, which is 95% of my current riding, and they are still quite adequate for wet, so I'm going with the PR2s.
 

·
site supporter
Joined
·
6,051 Posts
Stainless steel brake lines - variable
I haven't found any good information on what the benefits are here. Can someone point me in the right direction?

Stock brake lines degrade over time. As the tubing ages, it loses strength and allows the internal cavity to expand. That increases the volume in the system. You can compensate somewhat by adding fluid, but the weaker tubing walls allow the lines to expand when the brake lever is applied, thus robbing the brake line/system of hydraulic pressure. Yours are four years old.

Steel braided lines resist expansion more and for a longer time, giving you access to the maximum braking force your other components can generate. Braking is highly useful and recommended in many riding situations.

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
If I don't notice any issues with my braking (seems very responsive to me) would it still be recommended to replace them with steel braided lines, or should I wait until they appear to be less effective?
 

·
site supporter
Joined
·
6,051 Posts
Validatorian, I can tell you really like making lists and planning. Like most other posters, I'd recommend riding a lot before making anything like a serious priority list. You may decide the SV isn't the right ride for you. You may decide you like another kind of riding (adventure touring, super moto, track days) and mods and upgrades you're planning now will be of no interest.

As for the brake lines, they aren't an urgent priority.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23 Posts
Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Validatorian, I can tell you really like making lists and planning. Like most other posters, I'd recommend riding a lot before making anything like a serious priority list. You may decide the SV isn't the right ride for you. You may decide you like another kind of riding (adventure touring, super moto, track days) and mods and upgrades you're planning now will be of no interest.

As for the brake lines, they aren't an urgent priority.
I do like lists :)

I'm continuing to ride, but I enjoy my SV immensely -- yes, I may grow out of it later, but I don't foresee changing to a new bike anytime soon. If I do, I am fully aware that some of these mods will not increase the resale value of the bike, and I'm willing to eat that cost, if it means more enjoyment now.

I'll likely end up getting more of a relaxed ride when I'm in my mid-30s, but as I'm 26 now, that still leaves a lot of time to enjoy my SV650. I have no plans or ambitions to race now or in the future.

Thanks for the comment about the break lines, I'm going to keep those in the 'postpone' section.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,738 Posts
As someone who tried to prioritize this for myself and someone who likes lists as well, I'll try to help you out.

  • TPS Mod - Yes, ASAP, and do it yourself
  • R6 Throttle tube - never did it, but those who have like it. From the info you've given, I don't think it needs to be an ASAP mod until you've ridden much more
  • Adjusting Stock damper/compression - Only matters if you have a suspension that allows damping and compression adjustment...
  • Heavier weight fork oil - Contact Sonic Springs
  • Ensure control levers and pedals are properly adjusted - this is basic "Your bike and you" stuff, do it ASAP. Only you can figure out when it is right for you, so keep playing with it
  • Bar end mirrors - if you like bar ends, then get one that you like the looks of and is highly recommended. Napoleans are highly recommended. I prefer the normal fairing mounted mirrors with Delrin mirror extenders. I can provide info on that if it interests you
  • Ensure proper tire pressure - again, "Your bike and you." Tire pressure depends on how you ride, where you ride, and marginally what kind of tires you have. When super slab commuting on Avon Storm 2 Ultras (triple compound sport-touring tire with good rain performance) I would have it around 38psi each. When I would go into the mountains I'd run around 34 each. Air is cheap and so is a gauge, so find what you like
  • aTRE - you probably won't notice the difference, but it's a good way to spend $27 and it won't hurt anything
  • MotoSliders - DROP THE HAMMER NOW! Make these your next purchase, and yes you found the right ones
  • Swing arm sliders - they don't actually do much to save the swingarm in most crashes, but they make it a hell of a lot easier to put your bike on a stand
  • Headlamps - These are awesome
  • Spray paint interior of windscreen flat black - Um, why? If you go into a tuck it kinda makes it hard to see...
  • Spark plugs - Check the maintenance interval in the service manual and replace as needed. No brand is going to give you exceptional performance over the other, so long as you got the right size
  • Tires - trust me when I say you're going to like the first set of tires you get. Once those wear out, feel free to compare and contrast with a different brand and go from there. Once again, this is "Your bike and you" stuff, and there is no tire that is far and away the best for the SV. I swear by Avon Storm 2 Ultra's, whereas another prominent member hated them like no other. You don't ride in the rain, so you probably won't benefit much from the Storm's. Learn to read date codes though, especially when finding tire bargains.
  • Aftermarket shocks - This all depends on money. A ZX-10R OEM swap will work just fine for you, but so will a tuned Penske double clicker made for the SV.
  • Aftermarket forks - contact Sonic Springs, you won't be disappointed. With your riding, you don't need more than new springs and new oil. But again money is a factor, and you can spend a bunch on cartridge emulators and GSXR conversions.
  • Aftermarket seat - keep riding. If you've got $75 to blow, contact agreatdaytoride.com. Still don't like the seat? Corbin or Sargent
  • High flow air filter - K&N if you need one. It'll make your bike louder before it'll give you any more horsies. If your current air filter needs replacing there are few reasons to not go to the K&N hough.
  • Fender eliminator - pick whats in your budget and what you think looks the best cross referenced with reviews. The previous owner of mine took a hacksaw to it, but it looked fine from almost every angle
  • New horn - Stebel Nautilus. There is a thread on SVR as well as TwistedThrottle's wiring diagram that are dead simple to follow
  • Heated grips - Symtec. And do it before you're stuck out one night in mesh gloves and 50* weather.
  • Slip-on - I actually make it a point to buy bikes with slip-ons already installed, because I never feel like dropping that kind of cash. However, check out Delkivic, as they are very affordable and very reputable. The main thing is sound.
  • Stainless brake lines - What Fatass said. You'll notice a difference, and it'll definitely be beneficial, but you can get away with it for now.
  • Desnorkel - just noise mainly, as you won't notice the difference in power

The only other things I can think of are as follows:
  • Brake pads - replace them when you change your lines. I went with EBC, but you can read numerous threads on the appropriate compound for your riding style
  • Sprockets - different tooth combinations change the power application. When I was riding hard in the mountains I loved 15F/47R, but after I wrecked I loved the stock 15/44. Get steel sprockets, and price really doesn't really indicate a quality difference for the SV.
  • Chain - replace the chain and sprockets as a set. If you change the sprocket sizes, make sure you account for the change in chain links.
  • Gear discussions - rain gear, cold gear, hot gear, protective gear, helmet characteristics, glove styles, etc
  • Luggage - tons of options if you want it

If you don't understand any of the terms I used, then go to google and type in "site:svrider.com search terms". I'm sure you know what that will do, and you should do it often because you'll probably learn more from whatever you find than a few trite responses of personal experience from people who don't remember where the original thread is :D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23 Posts
Discussion Starter · #17 ·
As someone who tried to prioritize this for myself and someone who likes lists as well, I'll try to help you out.

  • TPS Mod - Yes, ASAP, and do it yourself
  • R6 Throttle tube - never did it, but those who have like it. From the info you've given, I don't think it needs to be an ASAP mod until you've ridden much more
  • Adjusting Stock damper/compression - Only matters if you have a suspension that allows damping and compression adjustment...
  • Heavier weight fork oil - Contact Sonic Springs
  • Ensure control levers and pedals are properly adjusted - this is basic "Your bike and you" stuff, do it ASAP. Only you can figure out when it is right for you, so keep playing with it
  • Bar end mirrors - if you like bar ends, then get one that you like the looks of and is highly recommended. Napoleans are highly recommended. I prefer the normal fairing mounted mirrors with Delrin mirror extenders. I can provide info on that if it interests you
  • Ensure proper tire pressure - again, "Your bike and you." Tire pressure depends on how you ride, where you ride, and marginally what kind of tires you have. When super slab commuting on Avon Storm 2 Ultras (triple compound sport-touring tire with good rain performance) I would have it around 38psi each. When I would go into the mountains I'd run around 34 each. Air is cheap and so is a gauge, so find what you like
  • aTRE - you probably won't notice the difference, but it's a good way to spend $27 and it won't hurt anything
  • MotoSliders - DROP THE HAMMER NOW! Make these your next purchase, and yes you found the right ones
  • Swing arm sliders - they don't actually do much to save the swingarm in most crashes, but they make it a hell of a lot easier to put your bike on a stand
  • Headlamps - These are awesome
  • Spray paint interior of windscreen flat black - Um, why? If you go into a tuck it kinda makes it hard to see...
  • Spark plugs - Check the maintenance interval in the service manual and replace as needed. No brand is going to give you exceptional performance over the other, so long as you got the right size
  • Tires - trust me when I say you're going to like the first set of tires you get. Once those wear out, feel free to compare and contrast with a different brand and go from there. Once again, this is "Your bike and you" stuff, and there is no tire that is far and away the best for the SV. I swear by Avon Storm 2 Ultra's, whereas another prominent member hated them like no other. You don't ride in the rain, so you probably won't benefit much from the Storm's. Learn to read date codes though, especially when finding tire bargains.
  • Aftermarket shocks - This all depends on money. A ZX-10R OEM swap will work just fine for you, but so will a tuned Penske double clicker made for the SV.
  • Aftermarket forks - contact Sonic Springs, you won't be disappointed. With your riding, you don't need more than new springs and new oil. But again money is a factor, and you can spend a bunch on cartridge emulators and GSXR conversions.
  • Aftermarket seat - keep riding. If you've got $75 to blow, contact agreatdaytoride.com. Still don't like the seat? Corbin or Sargent
  • High flow air filter - K&N if you need one. It'll make your bike louder before it'll give you any more horsies. If your current air filter needs replacing there are few reasons to not go to the K&N hough.
  • Fender eliminator - pick whats in your budget and what you think looks the best cross referenced with reviews. The previous owner of mine took a hacksaw to it, but it looked fine from almost every angle
  • New horn - Stebel Nautilus. There is a thread on SVR as well as TwistedThrottle's wiring diagram that are dead simple to follow
  • Heated grips - Symtec. And do it before you're stuck out one night in mesh gloves and 50* weather.
  • Slip-on - I actually make it a point to buy bikes with slip-ons already installed, because I never feel like dropping that kind of cash. However, check out Delkivic, as they are very affordable and very reputable. The main thing is sound.
  • Stainless brake lines - What Fatass said. You'll notice a difference, and it'll definitely be beneficial, but you can get away with it for now.
  • Desnorkel - just noise mainly, as you won't notice the difference in power

The only other things I can think of are as follows:
  • Brake pads - replace them when you change your lines. I went with EBC, but you can read numerous threads on the appropriate compound for your riding style
  • Sprockets - different tooth combinations change the power application. When I was riding hard in the mountains I loved 15F/47R, but after I wrecked I loved the stock 15/44. Get steel sprockets, and price really doesn't really indicate a quality difference for the SV.
  • Chain - replace the chain and sprockets as a set. If you change the sprocket sizes, make sure you account for the change in chain links.
  • Gear discussions - rain gear, cold gear, hot gear, protective gear, helmet characteristics, glove styles, etc
  • Luggage - tons of options if you want it

If you don't understand any of the terms I used, then go to google and type in "site:svrider.com search terms". I'm sure you know what that will do, and you should do it often because you'll probably learn more from whatever you find than a few trite responses of personal experience from people who don't remember where the original thread is :D
Thank you very much, Datech, that was extremely helpful.

Does the stock Gen II SV650S allow damping adjustments?

The R6 throttle tube I made asap mostly because the cost is negligible, and I've actually gotten into trouble before when I wanted to throttle down, but had to release my hand to do so, because I had to readjust my hand to get the throttle high enough previously, so it's also a safety thing.

I'm actually not overly fond of bar-end mirrors, but it was more of a safety thing -- I often have to move out of the way in order to see what's behind me, which doesn't seem like the best situation. I'd love more information on the extenders.

The spray painting the windscreen thing is purely cosmetic, I think it looks pretty cool. There's a few threads about on svrider. I'm going to go for a ride later today and see if I ever look out of the windscreen at ant point during riding. If I do, then I agree, it's not worth it; I'm not going to sacrifice safety for cosmetics.

Thanks again
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,738 Posts
Thank you very much, Datech, that was extremely helpful.

Does the stock Gen II SV650S allow damping adjustments?

The R6 throttle tube I made asap mostly because the cost is negligible, and I've actually gotten into trouble before when I wanted to throttle down, but had to release my hand to do so, because I had to readjust my hand to get the throttle high enough previously, so it's also a safety thing.

I'm actually not overly fond of bar-end mirrors, but it was more of a safety thing -- I often have to move out of the way in order to see what's behind me, which doesn't seem like the best situation. I'd love more information on the extenders.

The spray painting the windscreen thing is purely cosmetic, I think it looks pretty cool. There's a few threads about on svrider. I'm going to go for a ride later today and see if I ever look out of the windscreen at ant point during riding. If I do, then I agree, it's not worth it; I'm not going to sacrifice safety for cosmetics.

Thanks again
The stock shock on the SV, gen 1 or gen 2, only allows for preload adjustments (the 7 step system). You can change damping characteristics by changing the shock internals, but that entails way more work than it's worth and you obviously can't change it on the fly. That is why when discussing suspension the immediate response is simply "Change it" as you can't really do much with stock.

A ZX10R (and many other supersport OEM replacements) shock allows you to adjust preload, rebound, and compression damping while the shock is installed on the bike. However, you'll benefit from the shock more if you find a local suspension shop who can dial it in to your weight while it is off the bike, as well as recommend other shock refreshes. My local shop, Traxxion Dynamics, happens to be a relatively well known shop, and will do adjustments for free. Once you get to things like respringing it or revalving it because of age or abuse, that's when things start to get pricey. Generally an OEM swap is done because it's cheap. If you end up spending $350 to buy a ZX10R, adjust it, respring it, and revalve it, you wasted a bunch of money on a shock that was never originally made for your bike. You would have been better off waiting to find a used Elka or Penske that was actually made for the SV, and then having it adjusted to your weight. Or, if you have the cash to drop, buy a new Penske from Traxxion Dynamics and they will set it up for your weight before they ship it to you. Also, whatever you do, don't get a ZX14R shock; it is way oversprung for the SV, even if you ride a passenger and have luggage.

The mirror extenders are just blocks of Delrin cut to match the mirror base, and are shipped with longer screws: http://www.ebay.com/itm/03-11-SV650...ies&hash=item2a1416e7f1&vxp=mtr#ht_877wt_1139

I used those with these integrated turn signal mirrors because I had flush mount signals that weren't terribly bright. I'm 6'0" 210# with wide shoulders, and this combination worked well enough for me. I also used the extenders with the stock mirrors after I broke one of the signal mirrors. IIRC, the stock mirrors are slightly longer (a few millimeters at most).

I would ride for a little while before you start rattlecanning your screen. One purpose laden ride of seeing if you use your screen is probably going to have a little bias. What if your riding changes a bit in September when things start cooling off and you want to trek a little ways into the forest, or jet up the highway a bit for a somewhat-nearby scenic road? You'll probably be pretty tired on the way home if you hit a 400 mile day, and crouching under the wind blast and resting your chest on your tank (or tank bag, highly recommended!) is a great way to stave off fatigue.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23 Posts
Discussion Starter · #19 ·
The stock shock on the SV, gen 1 or gen 2, only allows for preload adjustments (the 7 step system). You can change damping characteristics by changing the shock internals, but that entails way more work than it's worth and you obviously can't change it on the fly. That is why when discussing suspension the immediate response is simply "Change it" as you can't really do much with stock.

A ZX10R (and many other supersport OEM replacements) shock allows you to adjust preload, rebound, and compression damping while the shock is installed on the bike. However, you'll benefit from the shock more if you find a local suspension shop who can dial it in to your weight while it is off the bike, as well as recommend other shock refreshes. My local shop, Traxxion Dynamics, happens to be a relatively well known shop, and will do adjustments for free. Once you get to things like respringing it or revalving it because of age or abuse, that's when things start to get pricey. Generally an OEM swap is done because it's cheap. If you end up spending $350 to buy a ZX10R, adjust it, respring it, and revalve it, you wasted a bunch of money on a shock that was never originally made for your bike. You would have been better off waiting to find a used Elka or Penske that was actually made for the SV, and then having it adjusted to your weight. Or, if you have the cash to drop, buy a new Penske from Traxxion Dynamics and they will set it up for your weight before they ship it to you. Also, whatever you do, don't get a ZX14R shock; it is way oversprung for the SV, even if you ride a passenger and have luggage.

The mirror extenders are just blocks of Delrin cut to match the mirror base, and are shipped with longer screws: http://www.ebay.com/itm/03-11-SV650...ies&hash=item2a1416e7f1&vxp=mtr#ht_877wt_1139

I used those with these integrated turn signal mirrors because I had flush mount signals that weren't terribly bright. I'm 6'0" 210# with wide shoulders, and this combination worked well enough for me. I also used the extenders with the stock mirrors after I broke one of the signal mirrors. IIRC, the stock mirrors are slightly longer (a few millimeters at most).

I would ride for a little while before you start rattlecanning your screen. One purpose laden ride of seeing if you use your screen is probably going to have a little bias. What if your riding changes a bit in September when things start cooling off and you want to trek a little ways into the forest, or jet up the highway a bit for a somewhat-nearby scenic road? You'll probably be pretty tired on the way home if you hit a 400 mile day, and crouching under the wind blast and resting your chest on your tank (or tank bag, highly recommended!) is a great way to stave off fatigue.
I don't have the cash, it seems, after looking at the prices of new Penske shocks. I'll have to get Penske or Elka used -- Is there a specific model # or something I should look for?

I'm going to pick up those extenders, thanks for the suggestion/link.

I'll also hold off on considering painting, I'll make that a 'postpone' and only do that after I'm entirely comfortable with the idea and the implications.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,738 Posts
I don't have the cash, it seems, after looking at the prices of new Penske shocks. I'll have to get Penske or Elka used -- Is there a specific model # or something I should look for?

I'm going to pick up those extenders, thanks for the suggestion/link.

I'll also hold off on considering painting, I'll make that a 'postpone' and only do that after I'm entirely comfortable with the idea and the implications.
A good place to start on understanding the Penske shocks for the SV is here: http://bit.ly/OHHkzR

From 5 minutes spent perusing that, I can tell you the 8983 (for the SV) is a triple clicker (all three adjustments, remote resevoir) is best on a bike that will mainly be tracked. Otherwise you can save some cash by going with an 8975DB that has no resevoir but is spec'd directly to your weight. Depending on what deals you come across, I sure you could find a deal on one and simply spend a few extra dollars at a suspension shop to tune it to your weight.

There is also an entire thread dedicated to rear suspension somewhere around here, and it contains a spreadsheet of the OEM swap shocks with rates and various other specifications that you'll probably find interesting. I believe it also compares aftermarket models like the Penskes, but I haven't looked at it in a while.
 
1 - 20 of 35 Posts
Top