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My apology Kenneth, I was being a little bit facetious in that last post; I understood exactly what you meant, a 600 sports bike is not a middleweight V twin. In that slightly oblique way I was making a point that a middleweight V twin is not a super sports bike, and so it makes little sense trying to make it one.

I’m a SV650 fan: I have a K6, bought for £600 and I’ve spent about £400 over the last year and a half tidying it up (some bits really needed doing, like the brakes, radiator and front exhaust manifold), catching up with good maintenance (fluids, filters and stuff) and the odd small improvement at low cost (the GSXR rear suspension for example). I suppose on a good day it might be worth a grand, but I certainly wouldn’t invest £800 in a rear suspension unit, another £800 having the front suspension worked on, £600 on an exhaust and £500 on changing to a programmable ECU - because the bike is only worth £1000 to start with. Do you understand my point? I think it would be like those people who spend £20,000 modifying a MX5 - but never make it into a Porsche.

I like the SV650S for what it is: a low end sports bike- which makes me smile when I ride it just because it is cheap and cheerful.

Alan :)


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A 2006 SV650 will be worth between £800 and £2000, it seems daft to me to spend more or less the value of the bike on modifying it when a similar aged GSXR 600 with nearly 100HP and much better suspension costs just over £2000.

Well, what do I know... nothing by the looks of it.


PS. Don’t get me wrong, I like SV650s and have a K6.



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Othen, I absolutely did not mean to imply what you were saying made no sense, just that my experience is different. A 2004 with less than 15000 miles here, will fetch $2500 to $3000. We have 12 months of riding. So my modifications aren’t way above what I can sell the bike for. Plus, i still have all of the stock parts, and could easily cover my costs by putting stock stuff back on the bike, and selling the upgrade parts. Also, here, a comparable 600 supersport cannot be purchased for $2500-3000 unless it is pretty used up with high mileage. The occasional good deals come along, just like with the SV650’s. But, the nature of the SV650 makes it very fun to me, and it doesn’t go super fast- which is a plus for me as I am 51 years old. I’m not interested in hitting the ground over 125mph! Also, I plan on keeping my sv650s until I can no longer ride. So the upgrades, in my mind, are just price of future enjoyment for me. I didn’t do them with resell value in mind.
 

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Othen, I absolutely did not mean to imply what you were saying made no sense, just that my experience is different. A 2004 with less than 15000 miles here, will fetch $2500 to $3000. We have 12 months of riding. So my modifications aren’t way above what I can sell the bike for. Plus, i still have all of the stock parts, and could easily cover my costs by putting stock stuff back on the bike, and selling the upgrade parts. Also, here, a comparable 600 supersport cannot be purchased for $2500-3000 unless it is pretty used up with high mileage. The occasional good deals come along, just like with the SV650’s. But, the nature of the SV650 makes it very fun to me, and it doesn’t go super fast- which is a plus for me as I am 51 years old. I’m not interested in hitting the ground over 125mph! Also, I plan on keeping my sv650s until I can no longer ride. So the upgrades, in my mind, are just price of future enjoyment for me. I didn’t do them with resell value in mind.
I think we are not so far apart in our outlooks. My SV650S is one of four bikes in the garage, bought as a bit of a fun project and a cheap low end sports bike to enjoy during the summers. Like you I’m on my 50s and am keen on making sure my 15 year old son still has a dad for a while yet (so no more super sport bikes).

The plan for your bike makes sense for you, it sounds like you got a bargain or two with the bike purchase and also some of the parts. My project suits me: I have enjoyed improving my bike a bit, but on a very strict budget (I’m not a poor man, money isn’t a particular issue, but the challenge of seeing if I could achieve the aim within my self-imposed budget is).

As far as the OP is concerned, he is fortunate being able to choose: either enjoy his SV as it is, or spend his $1200 on some modifications to the bike ($1200 could go a long way if he judiciously selects bargain or used parts) or even sell it and add his $1200 to get a super sport bike. None is a bad plan, the beauty of used motorcycles is that one gets a really good bang for one’s buck.

:)




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Everything twag4 and Othen just said. I'm 65 and want to stick around as long as I can for my grandchildren. The 600 super-sports I've ridden are intimidating and hard to be smooth on. There's a ball rush of power when they come on the cam, and when they do you'd best have a plan. V-2's don't do this. They run the meat of their power bands and provide instant, no waiting torque at the crack of throttle, while offering superior compression braking to boot. Easier to ride fast in any environment other than a straight road. I have a ZRX1100 for when I want to lay on the tank and twist the screw, but unless I'm traveling someplace my '01 SV is just more fun. I bought it cheap, modified it to my liking, and am not worried about what it will sell for because it makes me happy.
 

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Each to their own, I guess.

I bought my SV after my Daytona 675R was stolen. Insurance paid out the finance and left me with AU$3500 in hand. That's not enough for a supersport 600 less than 15 years old here (and I find i4 600s totally uninspiring) let alone a 750+. About half was enough for a neglected 08 SV650S and the other half went on rebuild/servicing parts and considerable upgrades to suspension/chassis (ZX6 shock, fork springs and oil, GSXR rear wheel, 19mm front brake MC, braided lines, rebuilt calipers) and motor (velocity stacks, snorkel, Bazzaz, full exhaust, cams) and a little bling just to dress it up.

What I have now is a bike that will match an i4 600 in a straight line (up to 8-9,000rpm) and is nearly as good in corners.

The only big-ticket thing left is a GSXR front end for the forks and brakes (and I'm due for tyres, but they're consumables, so don't count) and I'll have a bike that's better for everything except drag racing, which I have zero interest in.

Cheaper than transplanting a V-twin into a GSXR600! :p
 

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I also tried the stiff springs and oil in the stock forks and will attest that the cartridge forks I have now are MUCH smoother and more supple than that cheapo stop-gap solution. TWF Racing charges over $1000US to modify stock SV forks with GSXR 600 cartridges, I was lucky enough to find mine used for half that amount. With a used Ohlins out back I just LOVE my SV now, as I suspect you will too after your front end swap. Shortly after the introduction of the SV, there was a magazine article that claimed the custom frame shop Harris had tried to build a chassis for the the SV, but found they couldn't improve on the original. Could've been BS, but it sold me on a Gen 1.
 

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I looked at the cartridge option, and decided it would be cheaper to just go the full fork swap, with the bonus of better brakes, wheel etc as well. You're exactly right - the springs/oil uprating is a cheap stop-gap... but still a huge improvement over stock.

True or not, that's a nice story. The SV frame has always been well regarded, as has the motor. It's really just let down by the budget bolt-ons.
 
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