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That's right folks, I am back with another build. This one will start out a bit slow due to a pretty aggressive honey-do list, but once it starts it will be hot and heavy.



So this is the starting platform. It didn't come with a title, but I have already rectified that with VA and I have a clean title in hand. The paint isn't nearly as good as it appears. The white stripes were painted by hand and in a lot of spots you can tell. The tank has been lined and the cross over tubes are clogged because of that. Not sure if there are pin holes or what, but I guess I will find out when I pour some MEK in the tank and go to town shaking the crap out of it.
I have worked it out with my daughter that I will fund the build and when I am done she will buy it from me. I am keeping a very detailed list of the expenses. Doing it this way will allow me to buy parts as needed and not have to wait on her to save up for them. Which should allow the build to go faster. I need to get it done before I retire while I still have a steady flow of income. While the honey-dos might keep me from working in earnest on it that doesn't stop me from looking and collecting parts for it.
I don't want to do spokes on this one. There is a guy that works next door to me that built a CB400A that needed some carb work done to one of his other bikes so I traded that along with some cash for a 78 CB400Tii front end, wheels, and swingarm (not sure if I can or will use that).



Yesterday I picked up a dual piston front caliper and mounting bracket off of an 85 VT1100C for a bit better braking. I also bought a caliper off of an 83 VF750. The caliper is the same, but the mounting bracket is different. I will use whichever caliper is in better overall condition and the bracket off of the VT1100C.

85 VT



83 VF (right center)

 

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The rest of the brake parts came in today.

I took both of the calipers apart to inspect, do a little bit of cleaning, and get an overall consensus of which one was in better condition. Neither caliper was in bad condition, but the 83 VF750 was just a tick better so that is the one I am going to use.

Everything mounted on the fork leg and the wheel mounted. The picture isn't at the best angle, but as far as I can tell I will not have to get a different rotor. Just like on the 750 I will send the rotor off to be ground flat and have some holes drilled in it.

 

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Well it certainly has been a long time since I updated this thread. There has been a fair amount of work performed so I will just try and catch you up.

As I pulled it out of storage. I pulled the tank and seat prior to putting it under cover. This one is going to be a fair amount of work. It is in worse shape than the wife's was. I gave it a few kicks and it turns over and there is compression so that is good.










Engine pulled.




She was a leaker.







Popped the top just to take a quick look inside. Doesn't look too bad.




My daughter only got mad at me once, so that was good. She was trying to use a wrench like a screwdriver and when I got onto her about it telling her all she was going to do was strip the nut she got all huffy. Her issue was that there was a bar in her way and the engine case was directly above and she couldn't get to the nut. I told her to work smarter not harder. Go below the bar to get to the nut. She was trying to loosen the bottom rear bolt that holds the engine to the frame.

Went to pop off the side covers to drain them of any remaining oil...yah not so easy. Instead of a gasket the last person that was in the engine used sealant. It took me an hour using a razor blade to slice through that ****. After I got the vast majority of oil out of the engine I hosed it down with some engine degreaser and am letting it sit overnight. There was so much crap built up where the front sprocket is and inside the points housing it was crazy.
 

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With half of the engine apart. I am pretty sure I know why it was leaking. The head bolts were barely tight. I think whoever was in the engine before didn't torque down a thing. One of the bolts that holds the cam gear to the cam was about half way backed off when I went to remove it. You can actually see the head of the bolt in the picture I posted earlier looking down at the cam. Even after a good scrub down it is still pretty filthy. It is going to require A LOT of degreaser and elbow grease to get it ready for future work.








Cases split in half. My daughter missed out since she found it more important to go to the mall than to work with me. It was a a bit dirty inside and I keep finding little pieces of the gasket maker crap inside the engine. I am going to have to go over the pieces very well to make sure I get all of that crap removed. I would hate to get everything back together only to have a piece of that crap block an oil passage. There was a bunch of it in the centrifugal oil filter.

There is still lots of scrubbing inside and out that needs to be accomplished before I can even think about doing any media blasting.

Thick sludge at the bottom.


When I was removing the windage tray one of the screws stripped out. After I drilled and cut most of he hear away and was using a cold chisel to remove the remaining part the boss/post that the screw goes into snapped off. It made a clean brake at the bottom of the case so no harm no foul. There are only two screws and three "riveted pieces. I remove the riveted pieces and drill/tap them for screws anyways so there will be plenty of support.


Fitted the rear comstar wheel. The 350 swingarm is a fair bit narrower than the 400. As such the spacers for the 400 are longer. I first tried to use the stock spacers for the 350, but the nut would bottom out on the axle before things were tight. I swapped the spacer on the sprocket side which was about 1/4" longer which looked to be about what I needed. Torqued everything down and the wheel looks pretty well centered. I can do some measurements to see if the wheel is centered, but the sprockets also have to line up which I won't know until I get the motor back in.

Well some quick measurements and a plumb bob tell me the wheel isn't centered. It is about 3/16" off. I have a long piece of the spacer material, but I don't have the equipment to cut it and ensure the ends stay square. I am not going to cut anything until I ensure the sprockets align though. Which may be another problem. I am having trouble finding someone that makes a 520 rear sprocket. I found them for the 750 and 350, but can't seem to locate one for the 400. The sprockets are almost identical between the 350 and 400. The only difference between them is the distance away from center the mounting bolts are. The 400 is not quite 1/8" further out from center.

Just received a call from Sprocket Specialists who can make it. The T1 sprocket, which they have in stock, has the same dimensions I provided. It just don't use the center steel spacer ring that the T2 does. To keep everything copacetic with mounting all they said they would have to do was cut the teeth and a bit below where the chain rides down to 520. Which is pretty much what I thought. Cost is only an additional $10.
 

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So I was doing some cleaning to the main wiring harness and connectors last night and forgot to post about it. I remembered about the cable that runs from the starter solenoid to the starter. When we took the engine out there was a big glob of caulk on it. I decided to pull off the glob and see what was underneath. Looks like I will be getting a new cable.









Now onto the big stuff. I tried to document it as I went along to make an informative post on the CB boards. There was another guy who put comstars on his 350 and said they fit up just fine. However, based on my findings his wheel is not centered. Reading through his other posts he was not the most mechanically inclined fellow so he probably just eyeballed it and thought he was good. Yah that **** doesn't work for me.

Leveled the bike, took some measurements, and found the center of the frame. Made a mark and tied my plumb bob to it.
Stock wheel shows to be centered in the frame.






With the comstar wheel on using the 350 spacers and the axle nut tightened until it bottoms out on the axle there is a gap.




It was hard to get in there and get a truly accurate measurement, but it was real close to 1/8". So I stacked a couple of washers I had and fit the wheel again. This time with good results. The axle nut tightened fully and the wheel was centered.






Now for the big test. Do the sprockets line up? I got my trusty straight edge and laid it next to both sprockets. There are no gaps between the sprockets and straight edge and the wheel is centered. I am calling this a success. Now I just need to get one of the longer spacers I have cut down to the correct size for my application. By my calculations the spacer size on the right side should be 37mm (mine actually measures 37.25mm)




Removed the mufflers from the head pipes. What a chore that was. The were rusted in place pretty damn good. I have had them hanging with some PB blaster squirted in the joint for a while to help. I think it did on one, but the other took some more drastic measures to separate the muffler from the head pipe.




At some point someone painted the head pipes black. The problem is that just looking at them the paint would scrape off. So I took a wire wheel to them and removed all of the paint. For some reason just about every head pipe I see has the same rust area on the right pipe. The left side is usually OK. I am thinking about having them cerakoted. There is a local place that I am going to contact tomorrow to see what they want to charge.






Witchcraft and voodoo day. I am going to clean and rebuild the carbs. I bought extra o-rings when I built the wife's bike so I should be able to get these back together today providing the internals are good to go.

When you pop the top this is what you see. Nothing spectacular, just a spring and diaphragm. Those come out fairly easy, but since it has been a while since they were opened you have to be gently with the diaphragm so you don't tear it.




Inside are these parts. I don't really think it is necessary to take it apart, but since I am in there and want to make sure everything is nice and clean so off they go.



Now flip the carb over and pull the float bowl. This is where it usually gets nasty and stinky. Old gas reeks.



Pull the primary and secondary jets. They took some work to get out. The o-rings were damn near welded in there.



Pull the float and bracket for the float need and seat.



At the top you have the float needle and seat. Then below that is the secondary and then the main emulsion tubes. Underneath the black rubber piece is the pilot jet. The emulsion tubes have to be tapped out from the other side even tough it looks like the main can be unscrewed. It doesn't and if you try, you will rip off the tabs. I use a soft wooden dowel to tap them out. Sometimes they don't like to come out very easily, but luckily I didn't have much of an issue. After they are out you just have to inspect the tips carefully to make sure they didn't get damaged during the removal process. Pry up the rubber plug and unscrew the pilot jet.



Everything cleaned and ready for assembly. The emulsion tubes have tiny holes in them. Just about every hole was clogged and the holes in the pilot jet were clogged as well. The main and secondary jets were really restricted as well with built up varnish and gunk.
Unfortunately, I forgot that I had to use one of the o-rings from the extra sets I bought on the wife's bike because I accidentally slung one across the garage when I was installing it. Also, I didn't have any spare o-rings for the idle mixture or the float bowl drain screws so I will have to order those as well. Ideally, I would like to dunk the carb in some Berryman's, but there are two felt washers on each side of the throttle bar that runs through the carb body that will get eaten away from the chemical. So I spray down every hole with some crab cleaner then blow them out. Seems to work pretty well.



I thought I may of had an issue. While I was cleaning the carb bodies I noticed they are not the same carbs. One is a 722A, which is correct for the bike. The other is a 726A, which I have no idea where it is from. They look identical and the only difference I found between them was the main jet size, which could have been changed by a previous owner. I put the correct size main jet back in when I assembled it though. Additionally, I see a lot of references that group the two together.

One of the CB gurus replied to me and said I should be good to go. Honda put a new number on the replacement carbs to differentiate them, but they are the same.
 

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Tried my hand at parkerizing. This is the first batch I did. I think it turned out pretty damn good. I really think (hope) the bolts are going to pop against the silver lower half of the engine even if all you will see is the head of the bolt.



Got a little blasting done

Inside of fender before.




All the parts.




I was doing some looking over the frame to hit the couple of spots I missed with the blasting. When I noticed a few holes in the frame. This is common since it is the lowest part of the frame. I am not going to worry about it sincve the frame is still structurally sound. The holes will allow water to drain out if it gets in there.




Cleaned and stripped the paint off of the wheels. The outside of the rear wheel was already done, but the inside wasn't. The front needed a complete stripping. I found out why they were painted (crappily) in the first place. The front had started to rust. I am not sure if I want to try and polish the outside lip portion and just have the spoke portion powder coated. I know it will be A LOT more work to do that and to be honest I don't know if it will be worth it. Let me tell you, scrubbing that paint off with acetone and 0000 steel wool sucks. I am planning on painting the plastic caps that cover the rivets whatever the accent color is for a little added pop.




I have been trying to get my daughter to think about colors. She sent me the below picture of a Norton Commando she liked the color of. However, as soon as I saw the pic I didn't think it was going to be a color she really liked. The picture she sent me was from a magazine article and the color wasn't a true representation. I found a picture of it on the interwebs and she was like ehh. I have been thinking about a light blue or green. I like the Leopard Racing Teams blue, the Motorex blue/green (there appears to be two slightly different colors), and the Petronas blue/green. I think a cream accent color would go very well with any of them. Although I can't wrap my head around how or where to put the accent colors. I also think the frame should be colored, but my daughter likes the satin black frame like I did on the wife's bike. Although matching the powder coat and paint to any of the colors would probably prove to be difficult. The issue is that if I suggest a color she will instantly not like it, but she has no real sense of how things will look or go together. I also don't know if I want to powder coat the forks are try and sand them down a little bit and leave then natural.














So my daughter wrote me last night (she is at sea unloading the ammunition from the ship). She liked the Leopard Racing color, but not the rest. I saw a commercial and told her to look up the cars. She likes both of these. I am partial to the green. She is supposed to get back Friday so Saturday we are planning on going to a dealership and look at the colors in person.



A dealership visit was conducted and a color has been chosen.


I started removing the crappy tank liner. I threw in 20 nuts along with some MEK and went to sloshing it around. Got the vast majority of it removed, but the crossover tubes were still clogged. I decided to let it sit overnight to hopefully slowly eat away at the liner. When I checked it this evening they were still clogged, but when I stuck a piece of copper wire in the holes it was a little soft. So a few blast from the compressor was in order. After a couple blasts in each tube there was a thunk and air was flowing cleanly through. I will do one more shake and shimmy tomorrow to remove that last bit of residual liner.

I also talked to my buddy that has done my previous powder coating and he is still doing some small stuff at his house. I might do all the big stuff at the industrial facility to save a bit of money and leave the smaller colored (everything other than black) stuff to him.

So I just can't leave things alone. I was so impressed how the sisal mop cleaned up the fork lowers I decided to give it a try to the wheels. First I needed to remove the tires. I swung up to Cycle Gear, but they wanted $30 to just pull them off and I had to take the old tires with me. Never mind, I will do it myself...so I did. It took a little bit to figure out how to position the wheel in order to get into some of the nooks, but I figured it out. Unfortunately, I don't think I will be able to do the inner lip unless I figure out another way to position the wheel against the mop because the shank on the buffer makes contact with the wheel legs. So maybe just the outer lip will be shiny. I am good with that.

You can see the part I have polished and the part I have not.


Did some more wheel polishing. It was pretty difficult to get the inside portions, but I figured out a way. There are still some areas I can't get, like around the legs, but hopefully the kit I ordered will allow me to get those spots. Not sure how well it will show up, but I put the wheels side by side. The one on the left is polished the one on the right is not.



Got the forks together. It took me two trips to Cycle Gear though. The first time was to get some new crush washers for the bottom bolt that holds piston in. They didn't have any that fit so I walked over to the Suzuki dealership next door and they gave me the two I needed. :thumbsup: The second time was because I thought I had more fork oil in the jug than I did. They aren't perfect, but I didn't really want them to be. They came out a bit shinier than I wanted as well.

 

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I don't know why I didn't do this earlier, but I measured the two front ends. I got them based on others saying they just bolted them on and everything was great. The set from the 400 are longer right at 1.75" longer so I don't see how people didn't notice the difference. You can't just raise them through the triples because the top cap bolt on the forks is what keeps the triple on. The top triple isn't a pinch style like we are accustomed to seeing.

Two ides jumped into my head. Raise them through the triples and use a spacer to take of the difference. Put a set of clipons in there. Depending on the width clipon bracket I may have to add a shim or two or I may have to mill a little bit off of it. Not sure how the clipons would look though.

Using the 400 top triple is out. I forgot that the hole for the fork tubes is smaller than the tubes themselves. The fork tubes sit on the underside of the triple and the fork caps secure everything together. The hole in the triple is 29mm and the forks are 33mm. Even if I drill out the holes in the triple so the fork tubes slide through there will be nothing to secure everything together because the 400 triple does not pinch against the fork tubes.

So I put the 350 triples on the tubes and raised the tubes the approximate amount. I was worried that the width of the triples might be different so fitting the wheel could be an issue. Slid the 400 triple over the top of the 350 triple and they appeared to be the same. However, to make sure I mounted the wheel up. Then added set of clipons to get a guestimate of how it might look. I used my spare set from the Triumph which are for 50mm forks, but it might not look too bad with a properly sized set.









There is a little bit of space to work with so I will have to be very selective in the set of clipons I pick out.





Found a couple sets that I think would work.

Found these locally for a good price and obviously no shipping. The thickness of the wall might be an issue, but I can bring my spare triple to physically see if they will sit flush.



Found these online for a bit more and has shipping. Waiting on word from the seller about the width, but the wall thickness looks thinner. I am going to ask the seller about the wall thickness as well.



Measured the available space on the triple. It looks like I have just a shade over 6mm to play with. The local ones do not look like they will fit, but I asked the guy if we could meet up to see. The online guy replied that his are 1 1/8" tall and have a wall thickness of 3/16".
 

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My mind never stops...

We are trying to narrow down a seat. GREAT GOOGLY MOOGLY are those things expensive. The place I get a lot of my parts (4into1) has some relatively inexpensive, but they are the Chinese stuff you see on ebay. I just wouldn't have to go through ebay and wait a month for it to be delivered. Some of the other places like Dime City Cycles "make" their own, but with shipping I am looking at $300. Regardless which way I go I will have to make modifications to the frame in order to attach them. So that needs to be done before powder coating. On top of that I will more than likely need parts welded to the frame. I don't have a welder. Damn it Bruce will you hurry up and buy one so I can use it.

These are some of the options we are looking at. I wish the ones from 4-1 had the lighter color, but they don't. I guess I could always go with black though.

Café Racer $89 20.5" long. Might be a bit short.


Street Tracker $115 23.5" long, just about right


Brisbane $115 25" long. Might be about an inch long, but I don't think it would look bad. The only one without stitched seams going across the seat.


TT Racer $110 21" long. Might be a tad short.



Well my daughter picked the street tracker seat. I am going to email 4-1 and see if they can get it in the natural brown color, like in the pic below, vice the marble mahogany.

I guess I could always get it recovered later on down the road.

 

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Picked up the clipons from the local guy today. I did a bit of mock up to give you all a bit of visual reference. There is a plan in place to make them fit. Once assembled I noticed a couple of issues in regards to the gauges. The fork tubes will hit the gauges when they are extended through the triple and with the clipons installed they interfere with the gauges. The first solution that jumps in my head would be to make a small bracket out of some flat stock to extend them out a bit.

With the gauges mounted.






 

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I have been working on the wiring a bit for the controls. I wouldn't mind using a set of second gen controls. I have a buddy that has a master cylinder from a 2nd gen S that I can get from him.
If I can find a set of controls and a clutch perch I would be in business. So if anyone has some leads or some for sale let me know.
 

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I think I figured out the wiring.

Looking at most of the solutions to modify a stock reflector to accept an H4 bulb only one was acceptable to me. While nicely done, that one still didn’t look as simple as what I had in my head. So here we are. My idea will allow you to easily swap bulbs without having to undo copious amounts of safety wire and will leave you with a nice looking application.

I had a couple of spare headlights from previous builds that used H4 bulbs. I got to thinking how were the mounts connected to the glass. Well, there are just a few pressed in tabs that keep the parts together. Before you remove the mount make sure you notate which direction is up on it. You can easily press the tabs out and remove the mount. Once done you now have a solid foundation for an H4 bulb. If you don’t have any spare lights I suggest going to a junk yard or your local auto parts store and pick up the cheapest light you can find that uses an H4 bulb.

My donor light. I think it came from my CB750. In the second pic you can see where the tabs were pushed out to remove the mount.




You don’t need to worry about getting super close to the base because you are going to drill a bigger hole in it later. The only reason I even removed the oem bulb was so that the hole saw wouldn’t bottom out on it. I have noticed a difference in diameter between the two mounts I have so whatever you have might be different as well. Don’t worry, it isn’t a big deal as it is only important because it will dictate how big a hole you drill. I suggest a drill press with a hole saw designed for cutting glass or ceramics. It will bounce around less on the metal. If you don’t have a drill press recruit someone to help hold the headlight in place. Use the rubber dust shield for the H4 bulb under the glass to help protect it and provide a somewhat stable base. Get the hole saw centered over the hole that is left from the removal of the bulb. Go slowly and keep the metal of the reflector cool. If it gets hot it WILL cause the reflection material on the inside to bubble up. Not a total loss if it does, but not perfect either. Now due to hole saws not coming in every size imaginable size you may have to do a bit of trimming to the hole you just cut. Go slowly as you only want the hole to be a tiny bit bigger than the mount.

Tab, this one had three of them.


Mount removed.



Bulb cut out.



Once you have the hole drilled, using emery cloth, a file, or whatever rough up couple an inch or so of the metal housing around the outside new hole. You want to do this so whatever you choose to adhere the mount with will have some tooth to grab onto. You will also want to remove any sharp edges from the newly cut hole. More on that later. After roughing up the area make sure to clean it thoroughly. Now would be a great time to clean out the inside of the headlight as well. Shake out any loose stuff that may have fallen inside. I then take a rag with some denatured alcohol to wipe out the inside thoroughly. Do not scrub too much against the reflector part you can remove it if you do. If you didn’t heed my advice about removing the sharp edges your fingers are probable cut up right about now.

Hole drilled and sanded.



I will say upfront that having to stop and take pictures during this stage greatly impacted my final product. The two part putty starts to get hard quickly. Because of that I wasn’t able to get it as smooth as I would have liked.

I chose to use some two-part putty because it is more controllable than mixing some JB Weld or other epoxy. You can get it in the plumbing section of just about any hardware store. Make a nice ring around your hole. Ensure you have the mount oriented correctly then press it into place. Once pressed in, keeping pressure on it, stick your finger on the inside and smooth out whatever putty has oozed through. You may and hopefully will have some putty come through the holes from the tabs that originally attached the mount to the reflector housing. That is good as long as it doesn’t impede bulb installation it will actually work to your advantage in helping to hold the mount onto the reflector housing. Trim away any excess putty on the outside leaving a little bit to blend/feather it to the mount. I keep pressure on it for a few minutes until I am satisfied it isn’t going to move anymore.



Putty in place. I did push it a little bit over the edge before pushing in the mount.


Smooth out the putty.


Putty trimmed. You can see it oozing through the original mount hole where the tab was.



You should now have a good looking and solid H4 bulb mount.




Did a little mocking up and frame de-tabbing. The seat isn't as wide at the front as I had hoped so the rear seam of the tank is going to show and a bit more of the frame than I wanted.

The rear frame hump has to go. I was hoping I would be able to keep it, but it just won't work with it there.






After cutting off the hoop, seat hinge points, and helmet hook. I still need to cut off the seat latch, but it wasn't in my way for what I was doing today.






The rear of the seat hits the frame.






Thinking about adding a brace across the shock mount points. It will also give me a place to attach some brackets to mount the rear of the seat and a place to attach the part of the fender. Every thing in green tape I am thinking about cutting off.

 

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Alright I have to send out a huge thank you to Cal on the SOHC4 forum. He bead blasted a bunch of parts for me. His kindness simply amazes me. After some thorough cleaning I should be able to start on getting the engine painted and put back together.

So now that I have the bead blasted parts back I was able to attach the rear fender in its correct location to get a good look at how things will sit. I think (fingers crossed) things are going to work out. The cross brace as I originally had it wouldn't work because the fender made contact with it. However, if I put it at an angle complimentary to the fender it will not only act as a brace, but a place to attach the fender to. I put the seat on and traced along it where the seat would be. It looks like I will be able to provide a lot more protection under the seat that I previously thought. I was originally going to cut it at the seam. Another added benefit of extending the fender under the seat is that it will provide me a place to attach a bracket for the tail light and license plate. Cutting/grinding off the upper lip on the frame will allow me a place to weld on some tabs to attach the rear of the seat to.

 

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Well it has been a while since I updated this thread, but rest assured there has been a fair amount of progress.

I got my rotor back today from being surfaced and having holes drilled in it. Tom at TrueDisk did an amazing job.




And of course a quick mock up of the front end. I have an amazing buddy that that made this for me. He milled out the pockets in the stock triple to accept the clipon brackets. He also made me a bracket for the gauges and added a bit of flare to it. I can't begin to tell you how happy I am at how awesome this is.












I had a lot of issues getting the seat to fit nicely against the tank and frame. With some creativity I was able to come up with a few solutions. I cut away some of the foam at the front of the seat to go around the notch that secures the rear of the tank. I also made some brackets for structural stability to keep the rear of the frame from twisting.







A little blurry, but you get it


Cut that off and weld in a flat piece in its place across the frame.




Now the rear brace isn't going where I had hoped. It needs to be closer to the hole. Where it is at I don't see it adding any cross support strength. All it would do is be a place to attach the rear fender. Not really sure what to do other than cutting the fender way back or denting in the fender in to accept the brace further back sort of like the fender is dented in towards the rear of the last pic. there is pleeeenty of clearance in the wheel well.





All right, I got the rear brace made. It was a bit of a pain to get the bend in since I don't really have the tools for metal working, but it is done.






Moving on to bracing the rear of the frame. I decided to use the stock bridge and just weld it in place. I used some flat stock on the inside of the frame and ran it up into the inside of the bridge for a bit of extra support. It is extremely strong and there is no twist. I cut the rear of the frame at the same angle as the seam on the seat for a bit of symmetry. Made some plugs for the rear of the frame so it isn't an open eyesore.

All welded and ground.


I did go back and weld in the divots from where I drilled out some spot welds.


With the fender installed. It uses the stock mount at the front bottom, but I have it bolted to the cross brace.





With the fender installed. I cut it down to match the shape of the seat.





Scrubbed down the engine. Getting the bead blasting media out of the passages, nooks, and crannies is always non fun, but obviously has to be done. When I was done there was enough media in the bottom of the basin to fill my cupped palm.

Proceeded on to blocking the head and jugs. The head has a fair amount of casting flaws, but it should seal fine. I also honed the cylinders and lapped the valves. I am starting to get excited about getting the engine back together. I just hope there is a semi warm day in the near future so I can get it painted.












Spent the last two days cleaning the engine parts with acetone and getting them taped up for painting. I also drilled and tapped the holes for the oil splash guard. Tomorrow should be just a quick acetone wipe down then on to the painting. Tomorrow is probably going to be the last good temperature day for the year so I have to get it done tomorrow.



What a mad dash rush of a day. While the temperature is warm the skies are overcast and threatening of rain. I felt a couple of sprinkles when I was setting up the table, but nothing afterwards. Needless to say I was in a rush to get the painting done before the rain moves in.

All primed




And painted

 

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Stopped by a cerakote shop today. He wants $70 to do the headers. I think that is fair. I was also able to look at some of his powder coat chips and I think the color I was looking at to do the frame in will work nicely.

Spent a little time this afternoon putting the lower half of the engine together.

With the guts in it.




Case halves assembled.









The good and the bad tonight. Checked the stator when I got home and it is indeed good. Well at least it ohms out good. My local dealership had a oil pump gasket in stock. They actually had three and the last time they sold one was 1987. They have done their annual inventory every year since then and accounted for them. A whopping $1.01 a piece.

Managed to get the clutch basket, oil pump, oil slinger, and stator installed (in the cover). However, when I went to put the cap on the oil slinger I couldn't get the snap ring to seat fully. Then I took a good look at it. Sometimes I will never understand people. Whoever was in the engine before decided it would be better to grind down a snap ring vice getting the correct one. So another part I have to go get.



Received my replacement cam chain tensioner wheel and was able to remove the rivet without boogering it up this time. A co-worked made the mandrel last night for me so I can set the rivet. Tonight I should be able to assemble the tensioner which will allow me to finish assembling the engine. Tracking shows the snap ring is at the post office so hopefully it will arrive today.





All the parts I needed finally came in so I was able to finish assembling the engine today. As expected getting the rocker boxes on gave me fits, but I managed to get them on. It took a few tries though. The first two times I couldn't rotate the engine through two complete revolutions. It kept locking up for some reason. The third time was the charm though. To make sure I must have rotated the engine half a dozen times to make sure it wasn't a fluke. All that is left is to set the cam chain tensioner and adjust the valves.










Set the CCT and adjusted the valves today. The engine is now complete except for installing the electronic ignition, but that has to be done after the engine is installed in the frame. The engine is now in a lawn bag and put away in the corner.
 

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So I am not much for sitting around. Ordered the gauge overlays then proceeded to tear open the gauges. The tach gauge was in fantastic condition. The speedo...not so much. This is going to take a lot of work to get usable.
















I got the speedo gauge all cleaned up last night. After I removed the corrosion with the brass wheel I applied a light coating of phosphoric acid to the metal surfaces and let it do its thing for a little bit to help seal the metal. Lubed all the gears with some white lithium grease. Not sure if the damper needs the RC car silicone grease yet or not. Tonight I will hook up the drill (in reverse) and see how she functions as well as get some pics. Still gotta see what I can do about brightening up the tenth mile wheels since they are a bit yellow.

Tested the gauges tonight and they work flawlessly. The damping rate is excellent so no need to go any further with the dissection to put some silicone grease in the pots. I ran them for about a mile varying the input speed. That takes a surprisingly long time with a cordless drill.











The gauge overlays were delivered today and I was excited to get home and put them on. They aren't the correct ones. They are for a CB350F not a CB350K. The correct set has been placed on order.
 

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It has been a while since this has been updated so hold on to your panties while I inundate you with my random ramblings and pictures.

The day the gauge overlays were delivered I was excited to get home and put them on. They aren't the correct ones. They are for a CB350F not a CB350K.
New overlays have been ordered.

Since I had time to spare I decided to try and polish up the jewels a bit. They amber jewel looked really bad...like someone had take sandpaper to it. I tried toothpaste, but it didn't do much of anything. So I tried some Meguire's PlastX. That stuff worked very well. It removed all of the faded crusty look and shined them up pretty well.

Managed to get the overlays on and cups & needles painted. The wind and cold weather were giving me fits. I ended up using my toaster oven to help dry the paint. For the white I used Rust-Oleom's gloss protective enamel. I used the engine paint for the black. The tips of the needles I used Model Master enamel in red-orange. The place where I am getting the LED's for the back lighting don't have any in stock. They were supposed to come in yesterday, but that has been pushed back to the end of next week. If I had those I would be able to assemble the gauges.





The weather caused some delays in receiving a few parts, but I finally got them. Back lighting for the gauges is wired up, siliconed in place, and working. I had to hold the housing to eliminate the light leaks, but I think the light is even with no hot spots.








 

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Stripped the paint off the tank and have the inside soaking in some phosphoric acid to get rid of the rust. Trying to decide what I want to do with the lip that normally holds the chrome strip at the bottom. I am not going to put a new strip on and I don't want the lip just sticking out.

I didn't want to run a kick starter on this bike, but don't want the spline for it just sticking out of the engine. So I bought a rusty kick start lever dirt cheap that I didn't mid cutting up. Took some flat stock, cut a circle to act as a cap, and welded it onto the kick start lever. I only welded half way around the cap so that the pinch bolt will still work. Still need to do a little fine tuning to the grinding so that it is even all around, but this should give a pretty good idea of the end product.




Finished and installed. I think it looks pretty good.


Cut and ground off the lip and tabs on the tank that is typically covered by the chrome strip. I will not be putting a chrome strip on this bike and I feel the tank just looks unfinished with the lip there. The removal of the rust revealed some pin holes. So I was forced to line the tank. I went with RedKote.








After using the phosphoric acid and some acetone the inside was nice, clean, and ready for the liner.


 

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I have been trying to remember the last part I need to make for about two weeks. Every time I remember I am in a place where I can't write it down. I was watching the Supercross races from last week when I remembered this morning. So I hopped up and went to the garage to make it.

The brake light and license plate mount. I knew I wanted to tuck the light just under the seat, but wasn't sure how to mount it. I ran through a number of options in my head, but settled on a simple bracket that I found in my parts drawer and some bent steel.

The first three are with just the piece I made. The colored in black part in sharpie will be trimmed to follow the curve of the plate mount part that came with the light as will the extra bit of metal on the back end of the bracket.
The last two pics are with the plate bracket that came with the light. Not sure if the angle will work yet with the tire, but it can be bent/adjusted to fit.









 

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I have really been struggling with what I want to do for a tank design. I originally thought of just doing a big set of Honda wings, but could never get the size to work. It was either dominating everything or too small or too long or whatever. It just didn't look right. I liked the idea because I had never seen anyone do it before. I am glad I abandoned the idea because I found a bike that had done it.



I was racking my brain for a while trying to figure this out Then it kind of hit me. What if I did a variant of the first time the wings made an appearance. I definitely haven't even heard of anyone even thinking about doing. Of course it will be modified a bit. Instead of a guys figure it will have a female figure. After all it was originally designed after a goddess. If you care to read it here is a good link to the history of the Honda wings. http://www.onlytrial.com/1/the_honda_logotype_120282.html





A member on Do The Ton whipped up this sketch for me. He is going to fine tune it and put some hair on her, but I really like the direction this is going.

 

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Took advantage of the unseasonably warm weather today and got a little painting in. Also managed to prep the wheels to be painted tomorrow. I can see those being a major pain.





I have been becoming more and more frustrated with my compressor. It is a 20 gallon, 1hp, single stage, 8.4cfm at 100psi compressor made for dental equipment. It just can't keep up with my demand. So I scoured auction sites and CL. I found this beast, made a deal, and brought it home. This is an industrial unit that should last me a lifetime. 80 gallon, 5hp, dual stage capable of 18.4cfm at 175 psi.

Loaded and ready for the trip home.




For reference, I am 6'2"





Got the wheels painted. It was a bit of a pain. Getting the paint on the inside caused some major runs and pooling on the outside. I ended up having to dab off the extra paint on the outside. That left some nasty looking marks, but the insides looked really good. So I took some steel wool and sanded the marks down and then went over the outside with some paint. A few coats in and they looked pretty good. I still need to go back and and get rid of the little bit of paint that seeped past the tape and do a final polish, but for the most part they are done. I still have the caps that cover the rivets and I am going to have them painted green to match the tank.






And the final polish is done.

 
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