Suzuki SV650 Riders Forum banner
1 - 20 of 37 Posts

·
Registered
2008 SV650S
Joined
·
122 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Since that has to happen, I was thinking of modding it so it can handle my weight. I’m 210 pounds, and because of that, my SG feels quite soft in the front. I’m sure this has been answered in the past, but should I just stick to oem seals and fluid and call it a day? Or should I try something different? I just got the bike yesterday, and totally missed that when I checked it out. But it’s otherwise a solid bike.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
835 Posts
Definitely get stiffer springs for your weight and 15W fork oil. The stock springs are designed for a sushi-fed 120lbs Japanese youngster, not a corn-fed American male in his prime and are by now probably worn out as well. In cold hard numbers that's a 0.71kg/mm stock spring rate. You'll likely need a rate of 0.90kg/mm. The goal is to have a total sag of 30-35mm.
Go to www.sonicsprings.com or the Racetech link below to find your optimal spring rate and get new springs and oil. I would also get new bushings while you're at it. You'll likely only do this once, might as well do it properly.

If you have spare cash, now is the time to also get a Racetech gold valve cartridge emulator (~$125 on eBay, beware of fakes). However you'll have to drill out the holes in the damper rods to 11mm/ 7/16in. Lots of threads on this topic already.
The next step up in price is a Traxxion Dynamics rod damper kit. A complete replacement but also much pricier ($500) and not as adjustable.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
545 Posts
I weigh 200lbs and 0.90 RT springs are working good. Have the preload adjusters so got the mechanical spacers cut to the right length (about 10mm shorter than RT's ball park rec), then 3-4 turns in on the adjusters gave me 32mm sag.
The RT cartridge emulators are also a great "bang for the buck" thing. They take a little fiddling to get where you want them, but once there, are a HUGE improvement over the stock emulsion tube setup..
 

·
Registered
2008 SV650S
Joined
·
122 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
That’s some great info guys thanks! Bookmarked all the links. I don’t want this to get too pricey since I just bought this bike for 2k yesterday with a bit under 22k miles. But $120 on springs and a few bucks more on fork oil and seals is very doable. And I guess a front stand too since I need to get that wheel off the ground. Good thing I’m a mechanic by trade so working on stuff doesn’t intimidate me.
 

·
Registered
2008 SV650S
Joined
·
122 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Wow, that's a fantastic price! 2nd Gen SVs are on the market for ridiculous prices (up to $4.5k) in my neck of the woods.
Military guy PCS-img needed to get rid of it in a hurry. For that low price I didn’t do a thorough check which is why I missed the leaky fork. But after taking it for a spin, I knew the bike was solid. Even the tires are nearly new.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
603 Posts
And I guess a front stand too since I need to get that wheel off the ground.
Get yourself a triple tree stand, rather than a normal paddock front stand, it will come in handy when working on the fork. ;)
 

·
Registered
2008 SV650S
Joined
·
122 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
An FYI, if you don't already have one, you're going to need a rear stand to go with the front pin stand. Pick the front up and it'll fall over without the rear one..
Yeah didn’t think about that. I used to have a rear stand but I sold it with my last bike. The initial investment to be able to do this myself is getting right there to what it would probably cost me if I paid someone to do the job. But once I have those tools, I’ll be able to do all the maintenance I want to this bike. And at 14 years old and 22k miles, I can only look forward to working on this thing quite often.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
545 Posts
Yeah didn’t think about that. I used to have a rear stand but I sold it with my last bike. The initial investment to be able to do this myself is getting right there to what it would probably cost me if I paid someone to do the job. But once I have those tools, I’ll be able to do all the maintenance I want to this bike. And at 14 years old and 22k miles, I can only look forward to working on this thing quite often.
I seem to need several new/different tools every season. The shop up the street that I've had do things like tire changing, valve adjusts, chains, etc.. has closed. Soo, I now have to do everything myself. Got a chain rivet tool, getting out my tire changer that I used for dirt bike tires, will eventually have to buy an assortment of valve shims. It never ends.. :p
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
754 Posts
Did someone mention a good set of stands ;)
I have a steering head pin stand too but I was installing a set of tapered roller bearings for the steering head at the same time as rebuilding the forks and needed to be creative on a budget.
View attachment 60513
Nice, need to make one similar.
Thanks for the reminder, need to order dog food😊
 

·
Registered
2008 SV650S
Joined
·
122 Posts
Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Ordered the parts and gonna have a shop do the work. It’s an old friend and I’m glad to support his business. Seals, .90 springs, bushings, and labor $700 parts and labor.
 
1 - 20 of 37 Posts
Top