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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'll start off by stating that I know I'm learning a lesson the hard way. I'm a relatively young female rider and this is my first bike. I know I've made a mistake... so please don't be too harsh. Heh.

I've had a 2007 SV650s parked (unused) in my garage for a little over two years. I had a battery tender hooked up to the battery and have verified that it is properly charged. The battery is working.

I did not, however, take the proper steps (as per the owner's manual) to prepare the bike for zero usage over an extended period of time. I tried to start it up yesterday afternoon and it cranks but does not start. There is fuel in the tank.

A friend of mine (who also rides) has convinced me that the fuel system is more than likely clogged and that the next best thing I can do is to take the bike to a mechanic to troubleshoot / diagnose the issue. Is it the fuel pump? Injectors? All of the above? Etc.?

Before I go through the hassle of hauling the bike into the back of a pick-up truck and carting it to a mechanic, I thought I'd make a quick post to see if there are any other things I might try to get the bike started. There has been some discussion behind mixing in a fuel additive to see if that helps but some think it is too late for the additive and that it won't do any good.

I know I have more work ahead of me to get the bike ridable but it would be nice if I could at least get it started.

Thanks in advance.
 

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Drain the fuel tank and replace with fresh. If you know someone who is mechanically inclined, test for spark at the plugs. I'd also check your air housing to see if any lil critters made a nice home in there!
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks. Draining the fuel tank doesn't look too difficult. I'll try that this evening, following these instructions:

http://www.ehow.com/how_7905996_drain-tank-suzuki-sv650-fuelinjected.html

My mechanically inclined father has agreed to check on the spark plugs with me tonight, as well.

However, some rider friends of mine are telling me not to waste my time because I've more than likely got bigger issues on my hands since the bike sat largely untouched for just over two years. If that is the case, I may just hand it over to a mechanic sooner rather than later.
 

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... I may just hand it over to a mechanic sooner rather than later.
don't give up too soon. fuel turns to varnish after a few months, this is likely your biggest, if not only problem. even with fresh gas, you may have to use a cleaner, (like seafoam), to clean out the injectors. might even need to remove them and clean physically.
 

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Unfortunately, if you didn't have the tank full to the brim you likely have more than a little varnish problem to fix. The tanks rust badly if left in a humid place with air space in the tank. Mine did this before I bought it.

Even IF you get it running by putting fresh fuel in the system....it likely won't run for long before causing you problems if there is rust in the tank. It WILL clog the pump inlet screen without a doubt.

If you go to the trouble to drain the tank...please remove the pump and check inside for rust. Mine had just a little around the fill hole...so I thought I was good to go. Wrong! With the pump out, looking up in the hole showed an amazingly rusted surface that had shed debris and clogged up the screen and filter. They are pretty expensive pieces so you might save some dollars catching this sooner rather than later. Good luck!:)
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
So, I've about decided I'm gonna tap into all of the resources at my disposal (people, publications, forums) and try and troubleshoot this on my own. It's fun for me, anyways, especially since it isn't my primary mode of transportation.

I'm following the instructions found here: http://www.ehow.com/how_7905996_drain-tank-suzuki-sv650-fuelinjected.html

... inorder to drain my fuel tank. I stopped at step three this evening because I'm not certain I have the correct size plastic tubing and I reeaaalllyyyy wasn't interested in pumping fuel all over my bike. I'll probably call a Suzuki dealership tomorrow but does anyone know what size plastic tubing will fit tightly around the piece that the fuel hose is detached from? I have both a 1/4 inch and 5/16 inch interior diameter tube (purchased from Autozone) and I can't decide if the 5/16 inch tube is tight enough. The 1/4 inch tube will work its way off of the male end if I don't hold it on.

Thoughts? Comments?
 

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you could just siphon out as much as possible, then remove the tank and pour the rest out, as you will have to remove the tank anyway to remove the fuel pump from the bottom and clean out any rust. you may spill a few ounces, but that's much safer than jumping wires to power the pump. step #4 sounds like you could throw a spark and start a fire.
 

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There's third party companies that clean injectors for relatively cheap. Id look into that.
This. I had fantastic results with
. Had a slow injector on the race car, and they got it (along with the rest of them) back up to spec for a very reasonable cost.
 

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I didn't have time to think this thru the first time around. Bust first thing I'd do is fuel pressure test. If that returns good. Then I'd think that narrows it to a tbody/ injector issue. I doubt its a spark issue, never heard of plugs goin bad but anything is possible. Testing spark is easy either way. If you spray a squirt of starting fluid in the air box an it fires up you'll know for sure it a fuel issue. If you have spark and the starting fluid don't work an it just like backfires then it could b a valve corroded stuck open. (Or closed) compression test would give a lil insight into that without ripping stuff apart.
 

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If you short the pump to drain the tank, you can measure the health of the pump by running it for a set time and seeing how much it pumps. The manual details this and you can get a really good feel for how it is pumping this way. A pure pressure test only tells you the regulator is set right....unless you watch the pressure on the road under maximum load.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 · (Edited)
If you short the pump to drain the tank, you can measure the health of the pump by running it for a set time and seeing how much it pumps. The manual details this and you can get a really good feel for how it is pumping this way. A pure pressure test only tells you the regulator is set right....unless you watch the pressure on the road under maximum load.
This is why I want to manually power the fuel pump. Unfortunately, I can't get the electrical connection to power up the pump. What I'm reading indicates that the connector on the ECM coupler I need to make a circuit with (to the fuel pump relay) is Y/Black, which is what I used... and nothing happened. The wiring diagram indicates that Yellow/Red connects the fuel pump to the fuel relay, so now I'm wondering if I should make a circuit directly from the Y/R wire (absent from the ECM) to the battery. Thoughts?

When I turn on the ignition, fuel is leaking slowly out of the tube I have attached to the pump (inorder to drain my fuel tank)... so that should be a good sign, right?
 

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This is why I want to manually power the fuel pump. Unfortunately, I can't get the electrical connection to power up the pump. What I'm reading indicates that the connector on the ECM coupler I need to make a circuit with (to the fuel pump relay) is Y/Black, which is what I used... and nothing happened. The wiring diagram indicates that Yellow/Red connects the fuel pump to the fuel relay, so now I'm wondering if I should make a circuit directly from the Y/R wire (absent from the ECM) to the battery. Thoughts?

When I turn on the ignition, fuel is leaking slowly out of the tube I have attached to the pump (inorder to drain my fuel tank)... so that should be a good sign, right?
If you are applying power to the correct wire....and no fuel is pumping....it looks like you might have found your problem!:) It's pretty simple with power on the wire to the pump it should run...if it can.

Only other thing might be to jump the fuel pump relay to make absolutely sure the fuel pump is getting power....you might have a bad FP relay. If you jump power directly to the pump at the relay...and it doesn't run....you HAVE found your problem! A simple siphon pump can drain the tank if you can't get the pump to run.

Depending on how much fuel was in the tank, the pump could very well be seized up with corrosion or gunk. Good job on tackling this by yourself! You should be proud, as we are of you.:)
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 · (Edited)
Thanks for the kind words and all of your input/guidance/suggestions. Your comments have been very helpful. :)

To manually power the fuel pump, pg 5-9 of the 2003 service manual says to push lock A on the ECM coupler to pull out the power source lead wire for the fuel pump/ FP relay (which is the yellow/black wire in terminal (?) 34, I believe) so that I can touch it to the positive battery terminal directly.

However, I own a 2007 and I'm pretty sure there is no "A" button/lock on the coupler. I didn't see an update to this process in the 07 supplemental manual, either.

So, what I did was insert a tiny piece of wire into the socket/terminal on the ECM coupler and then created a circuit from the wire to the positive battery terminal using a 5 or 6 foot long length of electrical wire with clips and a plastic casing.

Is this method flawed? Am I missing something or is there a better way to do this?
 

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it seems like pulling out the FP power wire is meant to remove the ECM from the equation, to prevent possible damage to the computer from the voltage spike.
i may be wrong on this, but it would be best to find out for sure before proceeding. ECM is a pricey part if you fry it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
I'm inserting metal into the socket/terminal on the ECM coupler (the part that attaches all of the wires to the ECM), so the ECM is already detached and removed from the equation.
 

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Rather than removing the connector, sticking a pin in it to make the connection should work just fine. If you are doing this and not getting any fuel, you might check for power at the fuel pump relay while you are jumping the connection. If you are, in fact, getting power to the relay....make sure you are getting the relay to activate and send power to the pump. You are almost there.:)
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 · (Edited)
Good news. I got the bike started today but I immediately noticed fuel leaking from the bike. Bad news.

Ok, edited to add that I got it off... nevermind!!

I'm trying to remove the air cleaner box and it is proving to be more of a headache than I anticipated. I've loosened the two screws holding down the clamps on both ends of the air cleaner but it still won't disconnect.

Is there anything else attached to the air cleaner box that would prevent it from coming loose? I know that I need to disconnect some couplers and a few hoses before I can completely remove the box but I was hoping it would come free(er) after I loosened the screws on the clamps.

Any help would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks.
 
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