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hi, i know that shock conversion posts are a dime a dozen here, but after spending about an hour looking through them i can't find the info i'm looking for. so i figured, hey, why not use the forum for what its for and ask if anybody has some wisdom on this topic to share.

i've got a 05 sv650 naked, i'm looking for a cheap and effective shock conversion. i've got a local seller with a good condition 07 gsxr 600 shock for sale for 50 bucks. i put the exact same shock on my bandit 400 and had good luck, but that's a very different bike. i weight 160 lbs without gear and do mostly street to weekend twisties kind of riding.

i can't find stories on here about an 06/07 gsxr 600 shock. what i'd like to know is
a) if it raises or lowers ride height, and how much. i read that an 08 gsxr shock lowers the ride height, but i couldn't find if this was the gsxr 600, and also it looks like the 06/07 and the 08 are different units.
b) if the mods on the toolkit or battery are the same as other gsxr shocks.
c) if anybody has a link to a table with lots of gsxr shock info--maybe a comparisson of lengths, spring rates, etc. that would be AWESOME.
d) why is it so hard to find what i'm looking for in c) ?

the spring rate i looked up on racetech and it is 9.4 kg/mm, or around 525 lb/in. i think this is about right for a rider my size...

thanks!
 

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The 07 gsxr 600 shock is 317mm with a spring rate of 9.4kg/mm
The stock shock is 330mm with a spring rate of 7.7 kg/mm

Because the shorter shock you will lower the bike, i have read 1.5". You can mount some raising links but it's better to find a other shock. If you search better you can find several threads about the 06-07 gsxr shock.
http://forum.svrider.com/showthread.php?t=45179
 

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Discussion Starter #3
yeah i actually just found this info by sifting through google searches. looks like it is better to go with a gsxr 600 shock 05 or earlier. it is just funny how there isn't one single table with all this info on here. but thanks for the reply.
 

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ok so i'm an idiot...that condensed version of the gsxr shock discussion is exactly what i'm looking for. i only found the long version, with its many pages. i stand corrected!:rolleyes:
 

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I am interested in this info as well and I did not find another post about it yet, sorry for digging up old post! I am wanting a GSXR 600 shock because you don't have to cut the battery box and I'm only 160 lbs no gear so it would be best for someone my weight based on what I have read. But I didn't know how it would affect ride height, so that info helps a lot for 07-08 gsxr shock. I was wanting to lower mine a little anyways, so would it be okay to get 07-08 gsxr shock and get shorter dogbones to raise the back up about 1/2 to 3/4 to offset the lowering from the shock? If so, what length dogbones would I need to achieve this? I have some that are a little shorter from a buddy's bike we lowered. They are from a boulevard c50 but if the length is right they should be fine. It is a way heavier bike and the holes are the same size. If those aren't right I'll make some from some 1/4" flat plate steel so I can have exactly the right length I need. To level out the front I'll just raise the front forks in the triple clamps in case you were wondering. I would really appreciate this info! Thanks!
 

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not sure if this is applicable, but i put a K7 1000 shock on my bike. had to make new dogbones out of steel plate to get the correct ride height cos the shock was much shorter. massive improvement in handling
 

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I have been doing some research on this and it appears that the 07-08 gsxr 600 rear shock has the reservoir more perpendicular to the body of the shock and therefore you do not have to cut the battery box to create clearence for it like you do for most other years and models. It still has all the adjustments such as sag, preload, damping, etc but just has a relocated external reservoir. I am going with one of these and am going to see what it takes to mount it. I am 165ish with gear so this should be the shock I need. It will lower the rear anywhere from 1 to 1.5 inches from what I have found, I haven't found any consistant answer on that. I am just going to put it in and use some slightly shorter dogbones I have laying around to lift the back up a little to compensate for shorter shock so that I get a rear height somewhere between 1/2 and 3/4 of an inch lower than stock. Then I'm going to slide my front forks up a little more so they are about 1/2 lower than the rear to improve turn in speed, which should put the tops of the fork tubes (not the caps) about 1 to 1 1/2 inches above the top triple. I don't want to go more than 1 inch if I don't have to, but I'm going to play with that a little to balance out handling. I want the bike to be lower over all but the front be a little lower than the back too for handling, better ride height for my leg length, and over all looks. Correct me if I'm wrong but from all the research I have done this is what I have come to the conclussion of.
 

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Then I'm going to slide my front forks up a little more so they are about 1/2 lower than the rear to improve turn in speed, which should put the tops of the fork tubes (not the caps) about 1 to 1 1/2 inches above the top triple. I don't want to go more than 1 inch if I don't have to, but I'm going to play with that a little to balance out handling.
I think that you dont have any room to slide the tubes 1 - 1½ inch above the top tripple. The lower fork legs will hit the lower triple.
 

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I'm not sure which dog bones to go with I am trying to figure that out too. I bought a shock last night and should be in by Saturday. I have some dog bones that are about 1/2 inch shorter than stock that I am going to use to get the back up as high as I can. I will see how much that changes ride height and I will get exact measurements on new dog bones and let you know what it does. I am going to slide forks up in tripples as far as I can to make the back work if it doesn't come up high enough. When I do it I'll also slide forks all the way up to see exactly how far they will go before I put them where I need so you can have that info as well. Thanks
 

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Did the 06/07 600 shock swap right after riding season started here on an 04 SVS. It does lower the rear, I would say around an inch, maybe a little more. I used 1" raising dog bones and it made it close to factory height, might still be a touch shorter, but i raised the subframe as well. Great shock, especially when you pull one of eBay for $5 with $10 shipping!
 

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Did the 06/07 600 shock swap right after riding season started here on an 04 SVS. It does lower the rear, I would say around an inch, maybe a little more. I used 1" raising dog bones and it made it close to factory height, might still be a touch shorter, but i raised the subframe as well. Great shock, especially when you pull one of eBay for $5 with $10 shipping!
Thanks for the usefully info !

Cheers,
Svillen
 

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I went ahead and cut the toolbox off as i don't carry most of the factory tools. I have replaced them with better quality tools, and either carry them in the trunk, tail pack, or saddle bags. Toolbox will have to be cut I believe, but you can probably get away with just cutting a hole in the front of it to allow the reservoir to slip into the toolbox and leave the rest of it intact.
 

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Some off those specs are not correct. The gsxr 600/750 06+ shock is 317mm and not 320mm.
That may well be true - I collected the info from other threads on the subject, and sites like Racetech and Ohlins. I compiled it for my own use, and I think I posted it on the other site with a bit of a caveat.
 
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