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Discussion Starter #1
Hey guys/gals..

I am brand new to this forum. I thought I'd register to see if there were some bright minds out there that might be able to help me solve my problem.

I have a 2003 SV1000s. It has been down for the past 3-4 months, due some electrical problem(s).

The bike blows my starter relay's 30A fuse everytime I turn the key in the ignition to the "on" position. Before the fuse blows, the lights will will come on for about a 1/2 second before the fuse goes. It never makes it to the fuel pump or anything. It blows pretty much right after seeing the lights for a brief moment.

Things I have tried include:

-tried jumping the bike from a car (no luck)
-changed the regulator/rectifier
-changed the spark plugs
-new battery
-checked the stator (in great shape)
-new starter relay
-new lead wire going from the starter relay to the battery
-checked all the fuses (none blown but the starter relay's)
-installed a brand new wiring harness
-installed a new ignition swith

After going through all these steps.. I have gone through a lot of "hopeful" fuses! When I installed the wiring harness with a couple of buddies, we looked for bad wiring and any poor grounds. We did come across a torched connection where the wiring harness connects to the ignition switch. We did not really notice any other bad looking wiring or connections. I immediately thought that the final answer would be the ignition switch. After replacing that last night, I'm still left with the same problem.

Back when I could still turn the bike on there were some symptoms that seemed to lead up to this. The bike would sometimes shut down on me in the middle of riding with no real warning. It seemed like the power would surge sometimes while I was riding and I'd have to struggle to power the bike back on while I was still riding! Sometimes the bike would power right back up with no problem. Other times it would take longer for the bike to turn back on. The bike was not overheated or anything. I'm not sure if it could be any cause, but I do have a Power Commander on the bike too.

My friend has been nice enough to let me store my bike in his garage lately, but I hate putting him at an inconvenience.

Anyway, I miss riding the bike and I'd like my motorcycle payments to be worth something :)

Any help would be much appreciated. If you have any questions in regards to what I've tried, then feel free to ask!

-Chris
 

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Have you tried pulling all the fuses in the fuse box and seeing if it still blows the main fuse?

What if you disconnect the big wire from the starter?
 

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Page 7-12 in the SV manual shows a schematic of the starting system. If you don't have the manual just do a google search for SV manual and download chapter 7. I don't know if you're familiar with electrical drawings so if this explanation is too elementary, I apologize.

The 30A starter fuse isn't actually feeding the starter, it feeds the starter relay.

The current path goes in this order from the battery - 30A fuse, red wire, ignition switch, orange wire, 15A fuse, Turn signal/side-stand relay, Orange/Blue? wire, engine stop switch, some colored wire, starter button (or Orange/Yellow to ECM and ignition coil), Yellow/green wire, starter relay, Blue/Yellow wire, ground.

You said the fuse blows shortly after the ignition switch is turned on. Assuming the starter button is not pressed at the time the fuse blows out, the short must be somewhere ahead of the starter button -- it's not the starter relay or clutch lever position sensor.

You also said the 30A fuse is the only fuse that blows. If the short was downstream of the 15A fuse, that fuse should blow first, or at least, the 15A and 30A fuses would blow at the same time. That makes me think the short is ahead of the 15A fuse. Which leaves the ignition switch and 30A fuse.

Since the 30A fuse would blow immediately when the battery was connected if the Red wire was shorted, the short must be after the 30A fuse -- which leaves the ignition switch and Orange wire.

Assuming that this schematic is correct with how your bike is wired. The short is in the Orange wire, either where it connects to the ignition switch, where it connects to the fuse, or it is broken somewhere in between.

Hope this helps, let me know.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I apologize for not getting back sooner in regards to this issue...

It's hard to find time to work on my bike since my I have to work out a good time with my friend (since it's being garaged at his place).


Donniej: I have tried both ideas that you speak of. When I remove all the fuses from the fuse box or disconnect the main wire going into the starter, the fuse still blows.

matthew: I do have the manual for the bike. What you say makes sense, however I have already changed the bike's whole wiring harness and ignition switch. Therefore, I would assume that it would fix any possible shorts in that wiring.

amtjim: I don't know if there is a recall for the bike for this problem. If you are able to find any further information in regards to a recall, then I'd be quite interested.

amidroc: Thanks for the link. I registered to view it and it does appear that many others have had this problem on the bike. Unforunately, it seems that all the wiring stuff that may have fixed it for them has not fixed it for me. But their symptoms and pictures do match identically to mine.

Is it possible that my main ground on the bike could be bad? It appears that the main ground goes from the battery's negative terminal to the center of the engine. This seems to be one of the few wires that I haven't replaced yet. Is there any way that I can test to see if this ground wire is the problem? I tried disconnecting that ground and running some jumper cables from the battery's negative terminal to the subframe to try grounding it in a different place. The fuse still blew, but took slightly longer the couple times that I tried that. Then, I moved the ground from the subframe to a negative terminal on a car's battery. Now no lights would come on, so the fuse doens't blow either. I do notice that my power commander has lights when I turn the key to the "on" position. I realize that my power commander is grounded separately though.

There is also a thin ground wire that is soldered in to the main ground wire. This thin wire connects directly into the wiring harness. I cut this thin wire so it was no longer soldered to the main ground. If I "separately" connect just the main ground or this thin ground the fuse still blows. If I have no ground, then I obviously get nothing. I just thought it was interesting that both the thin ground and the main ground both blow the fuse separately.

I don't even know if what I tried above really accomlishes anything, but I was just trying to be creative with ideas.


Thanks for all the replies and I am definitely planning on posting the final solution the day we find one!

-Chris
 

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When you say you changed a wire harness, how much of it have you changed? I find it hard to believe this problem would still exist if you replaced ever wire on your machine. I down loaded the Chapter 7 manual and that is only a simple schematic. If you have ever looked through a real service or clymer manual, there's alot more coming out of that ignition switch then chapter 7. I am flying blind here so bear with me. That 30 amp fuse is probably a power bus for several other functions. If I can get my hands on the actual wire diagrams, I would say the next few things to try would be disconnect the power to the fuel pump, inspect the harness and then try a new fuse with the fuel pump disconnected. If that fails, disconnect the head lamps plugs and inspect those harnesses. I am kinda wondering if the fuel pump may be jammed or internally shorting since it's one of the very first components to operate when the bike is switched on. The fuel pump probably doesn't need all 30 amps, but if this is a power bus, a shorted fuel pump may be all that's needed to burn the fuse if several other components are using that wire for a power bus.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Well....

I tried disconnecting the fuel pump and no dice :(

I'm not sure that that would have affected it though, since I don't have the run switch turned on. The problem happens when just turning the key to the "on" position.

I have a feeling that we're all running short on ideas.

Since I have not been able to figure out a better way to test the bike's ground wiring, I'm probably going to take it up to the dealership and pay for the diagnosis. I may just have them solve the problem from there. My curiosity is killing me!

If you think of any other ideas, then please feel free to share! Thanks for all the help thus far.

-Chris
 

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Does anyone have a full schematic of the electrical system like amtjim was talking about?

I'm not sure exactly what this wiring harness looks like, but from what you've described, I assume it's a plug that goes into the ignition switch with wires going to various components.

In order to blow a 30A fuse there must be a pretty hard short to ground since 12V/30A=0.4ohms. If that's the case you should be able to use a multimeter set on resistance to test each wire in the harness. With the ignition switch turned on and the harness unplugged you could ground the black wire of the meter and use the red wire to test each wire on the harness looking for a wire that shows less than 0.4 ohms. You'll probably need to test each wire for voltage first since if any of them do show voltage they will blow the fuse on the meter if it's set on resistance.

Since you first said you came across a torched connection where the wiring harness connects to the ignition switch, that tells you there is definitely a problem with that wire that probably still exists. That wire was torched at that point because that is apparently the point of highest resistance in a circuit that had too much current in it, but it's not necessarily the point where the short is. It sounds like the short is somewhere downstream of that wire in whatever it connects to.

This idea may not work because of the nature of the short, but if it's just a simple wire short, it may find it. Either way, it's a suggestion before spending the big bucks at a dealer.
 

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You could try this. Disconnect the connector closest to the ignition switch(probably that wire harness you changed). Insert a new 30 amp fuse. If you still have the old harness or ignition switch you replaced, you could go to radio shack and get as many inline blade type fuse links as you need to splice into each wire and insert a 20 amp fuse in each position. Then hook it up to the motorcycle and check for the fuse that blows when you turn on the switch and follow that wire to your short.
Otherwise, make some jumpers, don't use something that will cause the pin or socket to become deformed, you will get more poor connections. Using a simple multimeter, find the battery hot wire on the motorcycle side of the connector and notice it's position, then note the position it inserts into on the ignition switch side. Insert the jumper into those 2 positions and get the multimeter ready. Turn on the ignition switch, provided the fuse doesn't blow, probe all the other positions on the ignition switch side of the connector to find all of the power outlets and note their positions so you can one by one insert jumpers between each respective position on the motorcycle side. If and when the fuse blows, follow that wire through the harness to find your problem. If the fuse doesn't blow, jumper the rest of the positions if any. Turn the ignition before at each jumper change.
This may be worth doing yourself since it seems to be at the point of what the motorcycle shop will be doing, too!
 

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Discussion Starter #11
:thumbsup:

Hey guys...

I wouldn't leave you hangin on this issue.

After growing terribly frustrated after countless hours of troubleshooting, I finally took the bike up to dealer. I have some friends that are in pretty good with a Yamaha dealer, so I took it there.

It took them a couple of hours to hunt down the problem. It turned out that there was a short somewhere in the tail light wiring?! So I walked out of there $175 poorer. I kinda wish I took it there from the start, rather than spending so much money on parts previously. Oh well..... life lessons..

What kinda stinks about the it being the tail light is that I personally installed that tail light myself. I did all the wiring on it. It ran for months with no hesitation. Oh well, it's fixed now!

Thanks again to everyone for their replies!

-Chris
 

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I have a 2006 sv1000s. I rode it last week for about two hours after installing a brand new battery. The next day I try to ride it and it would not start. I changed the relay and put a new starter motor in it yesterday and rode it for a couple hours today but now it want start back up, I also just changed the oil. I can not get it started consistently sometimes it starts sometimes it doesn’t, any one have an idea why please comment message me [email protected]
-new starter relay
-fresh oil
-new starter Motor
-new battery
 
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