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Old 04-19-2017, 05:26 AM   #1
sv650bklyn
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Join Date: May 2016
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my dream in Blue & Black with tons of OEM mods (2nd Gen)

For any tips, ideas, or snarky commentary go to the comment thread.

Here is my stock 2006 SV650 in Candy Napoleon Blue before I started laying my inexperienced hands on her last summer.

The only customization it had when I bought it:
Steve's TRE mod ($30)
My initial mods were of the visual kind:
  • idiot sticker removal
  • Fender eliminator by eBay seller creese1 ($60 incl. 4 LED indicators)
  • Flash controller relay to reduce blinking rate of LEDs to normal frequency ($15 x2; I had to buy 2 since the first one burned out after first use and I missed my return window on Amazon)
  • Turn signal adapter and cable plugs (back, front, and plastic adapters to hold front LEDs to headlight brackets ($7 x3 on Amazon)
  • Bikemaster Daytona handlebar (much higher and wider than stock; $23)
  • Oury Street grips (very thick and soft, $13)
  • CNC Folding & Extending Clutch & Brake Levers (decent quality; $31 on eBay)
  • Bar end mirrors (Chinese knock-offs that won't last more than one season, but for $9 shipped on eBay it doesn't really matter to me; visibility is great when mounted angled forward)
  • K&N air filter (Yes, I know, newbie mistake since it is not a good air filter, but I'm still enjoying the gurgling sound it produces at 6k RPM for now)
I made 4000 miles in my first season as a real biker and rode until January 1st before it got too cold for me in NYC.
That's how she looked then:


The following mods were originally planned and are currently in progress:
  • front fork rebuild with Sonictech springs (0.90 kg/mm spring rate for my weight of 185 lbs naked) and 15wt fork oil ($120 for spring & oil, $100 for OEM seals, dust cap, plastic fender, etc. --> much cheaper if you get your fork seals non-OEM)
  • rear shock of 2006 Kawasaki ZX14 from eBay ($50) --> I would have preferred a ZX10 rear shock, however they go for north of $120 these days and the spring rate would still not be optimal for me. So:
  • new Hyperco spring for rear shock with 500 lbs/in; perfectly sprung for my weight (as ZX14 is better for riders above 220 lbs)
  • front and rear wheel bearings ($35 from Bossbearing.com)
  • chain: BLUE - EK 520MVXZ (520 conversion) & sprockets: Superlite RS7 Steel 15/47 teeth (vs. 45 stock, i.e. faster acceleration with slightly reduced top speed) --> 520 Conversion Kit - SUPERLITE RS7 Steel Sprocket Set with EK Chain & black sprocket nuts is $180 at Sprocket Center
  • exhaust muffler by FUEL F1R Road, black stainless round: great sounding, beautiful looking muffler from a small UK company; even with the 50 GBP shipping charge it's just a bit more expensive than Delkevic, cheaper than M4 and comes with lifetime warranty and dB-killer
  • Exhaust hanger in black from eBay, seller railsideperformance ($37 shipped from Canada)
  • Seat cowl from CMSNL.com; this is actually an OEM part! ($171 shipped to US from The Netherlands at current € rate)
  • Spencer's Seat Modification with Supracor (keeps stock seat shape but improves seating position, $75 plus your own shipping costs)
  • Bikemaster Superbike handlebar: while I enjoyed the relaxed seating position with the Bikemaster Daytona, I want to switch it up a bit and also narrow the bar by 1" on each side (with a pipe cutter) ($12 on Amazon)
  • Bikemaster Heated Grips: $40 on sale at Amazon; for nearly half price of the Oxford grips same functionality just without the automatic shut-off; however, I just need to find a way to plug them in the spare connector in the headlight then they switch off with the ignition.
Beginning of March I had the brilliant idea that I might as well do all the mods I want to do now and be done with it. Then I had the vision to have the bike in just 2 colors: the beautiful candy blue stays on but the rest is painted black as much as possible.
I found a reasonably priced powder coating shop and took off all the small parts and the clutch, water pump, and stator covers and all foot rest assemblies. I should get the parts back sometime his week.

Also, I thought I might as well customize my Combo Meter and install Teeriver's Multibot, the Illumiglo convertible gauge and last but not least change the ugly orange display LEDs to blue.
So, after checking my tappet clearance (which is still in spec after 40k miles), draining the fluids and removing all parts that needed removing, here we are:

I currently have a bit of a problem, since I had the brilliant idea to replace the front exhaust pipe (unnecessarily in hindsight), and as so many before me, broke off the 2 studs. Now I'm having a crash course in penetrating oil, cutting oil, and various ways of bolt removal (broke off one screw extractor already, now on with carbide drill bits, left hand drill bits, drilling, tapping and possibly Heli coiling... fun stuff at the end of April...).

Stay tuned... She should come back together piece by piece any day now...
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Old 04-23-2017, 03:55 AM   #2
sv650bklyn
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Re: my dream in Blue & Black with tons of OEM mods (2nd Gen)

I tried to get out those broken front exhaust studs today:

Blasted them with Freeze-Out (20 secs), followed by Liquid Wrench, tapped them lightly with a hammer, and then... the wooden block under the engine dropped and the whole front of the bike came crashing down.

Word to the wise if you have a bolt that may be corroded: follow the steps outlined in this article before you start monkey-wrenching and you'll hopefully never break off a bolt willy-nilly.

Luckily the Abba pivot stand held up and the drop was stopped by the oil filter, so no real damage done. The bike is surprisingly light right now, so after I struggled for a bit myself, trying to get the wooden blocks placed under the engine again, I was finally able to stabilize the bike with the help of a friend who was also working on his bike in my garage...

After that episode it was time to move on and get the rear shock and rear wheel back on the bike, so the Abba stand could hold up the bike by itself again and I didn't have to rely on those flimsy blocks of wood.

Surprisingly, I got a few things done in the end without any major incidents:
  • cut off the plastic tool box with a dremel (I have no factory tool set anyways)
  • new rear shock installed; had to cut off about 2mm of the lower mounting bolt so the rear cushion rod had enough clearance
  • new rear sprocket mounted
  • rear wheel installed with new wheel bearings
  • reflective rim tape from CustomTaylor33; left side sloppy, right side a'ight; I'll definitely do a better job on the front wheel tomorrow
I'm just happy I didn't completely f*$# up my bike today and got some stuff mounted back on, and the bike secured on the stand again with the swing arm strap.
Here's her good side right now:

With my phone's flash:
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Old 04-23-2017, 06:17 PM   #3
sv650bklyn
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powder coated!

Got my parts back from Arcane Moto in Brooklyn and they look awesome!
Before:

After:
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Old 05-05-2017, 03:05 AM   #4
sv650bklyn
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the monkey wrenching continues...

Here are some updates:
  • installed the front foot pegs, brake pedal and gear shifter without problems
  • installed the blue EK chain; all went well until I riveted the master link. The ultra-cheap chain riveter from eBay was not able to rivet out the master link pins. The rivet rod seems to be too soft. So first thing once my bike runs again is to have it properly riveted by my friendly neighborhood shop with some professional tools...
  • installed the freshly powder-coated black clutch cover; this time more or less without a hitch
  • installed generator cover also in black; but here I ran into another problem: when the cover was back on the bike, the generator cover plug was stuck. It barely moved forwards or backwards, so once again, I monkey-wrenched it out... With the result that I'm now having stripped threads in the cover and the plug:



In hindsight I should have removed the plug before bolting on the cover.
Other than having to buy a new generator cover, plug, and having it powder-coated again, I currently don't have a solution to fix this. If you have any ideas, please leave them in the comment thread.
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Old 05-07-2017, 01:01 AM   #5
sv650bklyn
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the monkey wrenching stops with this post

There is no way for me to get the stripped plug to thread onto the cover so I found myself a used generator cover for $25 on eBay and will just have that powder-coated again for a total of $60. Still cheaper than bringing it to a machine shop I guess. That's the price for being careless.
That was hopefully the last time I'll ever lean on a bolt, especially one with threads made of aluminum...
I'll also make sure next time to lubricate the threads with anti-seize, thread in the plug fully and torque it up BEFORE installing the cover. I then won't touch that cheese plug again until the next valve clearance check in 15,000 miles.
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Old 05-10-2017, 01:15 AM   #6
sv650bklyn
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rear shock & spring replacement

In case you're wondering about my rear shock:
The Kawasaki ZX 14R (and ZX 10R) rear shock is the exact same length as the stock shock, but with the bonus of being fully adjustable.
The problem is that ZX14R's spring rate is 545 lbs/in, which is only optimal for riders weighing in at 220 lbs or above. I'm aspiring to weigh less than 190 lbs before summer is in full swing, so a spring rate of 500 lbs/in is optimal. Check Penske's Racing Shocks Spring Chart to determine the correct spring rate for your weight.

I then sprung for the Hyperco spring on eBay and was nearly delivered a 1500 lbs/in spring! It was advertised as a 500 lbs/in spring, but as it turns out, the serial number revealed that it was a 1500 lbs one. Luckily Hypercoils stopped making them recently and my seller notified me they couldn't fulfill my order. I went to the manufacturer's website and after a few phone calls got the right Hyperco spring from Hoerr Racing Products.
In the case of my spring, the serial no. is HYP187A0500 (with '7' being the length in inches, 'A' the inner diameter of 2.25in, and 0500 the spring rate).

A big thanks belongs to user GWS, who had posted a great tutorial some years ago on how to do this replacement and where to get the spring collar, which is required when not using a Kawasaki spring:
https://www.svrider.com/forum/showpos...4&postcount=24

To do the actual spring replacement you'll need a spring compression tool. After buying a car sized one which did not work at all, I got the Tusk Shock Compressor Tool on eBay for $38 shipped. Not too cheap, but then again, cheaper than going to the shop, and way more fun too.

After nearly losing a finger (be careful when loosening the compressors, they will tend to slam into each other), here's my result:
before installation with the collar spring

after installation, ZX14R spring below

And yes, as has been mentioned many times in this forum, you will have to remove a plastic shield in front of the battery, held by 3 screws; and you will have to either cut the bottom mounting bolt by 2mm or use some washers to enable the dog bone on the right side to have enough clearance. All in all a simple job even a noob like me can't mess up too much.
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Old 07-09-2017, 05:17 PM   #7
sv650bklyn
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Re: my dream in Blue & Black with tons of OEM mods (2nd Gen)

It's been a while since I truly worked on my bike, mainly having to do with the frustrating experience of not having being able to get those #$%damn exhaust studs off, and also that I've re-discovered bicycle riding which has had the nice side effect of doing my body some good...
Anyways, after lots of head-shaking from various local mechanics and looking at at least $200 to get those studs drilled out at the shop, I followed the advice of one mechanic (who would have charged $700-800 for the drill job), and just got myself a used cylinder head for $75. It's clean, the valves seal fine and it's from an SV with half the mileage as mine. Replacement to follow this week, once I finally have all the new gaskets and O-rings.

In the meantime I put the front forks back together, which was an easy job, once I had figured out how to properly use plastic pipe as a seal driver. So here they are, powder coated in black, new gaskets, seals, o-rings, Sonic springs 0.90 kg/in and 15wt fork oil:


The Sonic springs are a couple of inches shorter than the stock springs, making it necessary to cut a new spacer and have a different fork oil level (110mm vs. 91mm stock). There are good instructions provided by Sonic Springs for all that. With these springs there is basically no pre-load when the adjusters are turned to position 4, making the threading of the caps back in less error prone (I still marked the beginning of the thread with a pointy piece of tape though). Looking forward to experiencing them in real life soon!
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Last edited by sv650bklyn; 07-09-2017 at 05:46 PM.
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Old 08-08-2017, 10:07 PM   #8
sv650bklyn
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Smile

After much procrastination I finally got enough courage to change out the cylinder head. With the factory service manual and Haynes manual it was not that hard in the end.
Things I learned doing this procedure:
  • put the frame spacers in before tightening the engine bolts
  • get a spare set of dowel pins for the head, as the old ones are very hard to get out without scratching them up
  • the 4 long engine bolts need to be oiled up on the threads and the top; this is critical!
  • next time I'll also change the cylinder bottom gasket; the manuals don't say it's necessary, but just for peace of mind.

While I had the piston exposed, I decided to remove the carbon deposits:
Before:
After 1 hour with loads of WD-40 and elbow grease:


Once the head was back on, the cams correctly aligned, the valve covers back on and the cam chain tensioner re-built (used new gaskets and o-rings for pretty much everything), I checked the tappet clearances and they are now at the tighter end of the specifications; so it seems I'll be good for a looong time.
The front cylinder head is from an engine with 15,000 miles and the rear is the old one with 41,000 miles but the clearances are nearly identical. So by all means, check your clearances, but if the engine has not been abused I assume you won't need to adjust your valves before 50-60k miles.

With that being done my spirits were lifted and I started to finally make some serious progress in getting my bike back together.
This is how she looks right now:

Recent additions:
  • FUEL F1R muffler; polished stock front exhaust with 24h soak in vinegar, multiple applications of Barkeeper's Friend, rub with aluminum foil (not sure if that did anything), and finally metal polish
  • new steering head tapered bearings: factory torque settings are way too high for these bearings; so I just tightened them so pull force required to move the handles is 350g (spec is 200-500g).
  • frame sliders and USB charger installed
  • reflective rim stripes
  • adjusted STV (secondary throttle valve) on throttle body; both were a bit uneven, so definitely something to check; I'll do a complete throttle body sync procedure once the bike can be ridden

I can finally see the end now! I hope she'll be ready this weekend...
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Last edited by sv650bklyn; 08-30-2017 at 11:29 PM.
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Old 10-02-2017, 12:40 AM   #9
sv650bklyn
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After much procrastination and research I have finally gone ahead with modding my gauge cluster. My plan is to:
  1. change the color of the display, indicator lights, and needle from amber to blue (& red for the needle)
  2. install Teeriver's Multibot which adds a gear indicator, volt meter, and speedo healer to your OEM display;
  3. install Illumiglo lighted display; in my case I have a white faceplate during daylight and black with blue letters at night; price is $60 on eBay for DIY installation or $140 from Bluegauges with installation (mail-in service).

1)
Switching out the LEDs turned out to be a bit difficult as they are glued to the board. After carefully destroying a few LEDs,I eventually figured out that you can melt the glue by using a heat gun at low setting for about 1 minute. So basically, carefully wick all solder from the LED then apply heat and they come off quite easily.
Very helpful in this were Chewy's 6-page conversion instructions from his instrument bling service page (only available in the UK, I recommend having him do it if you can).

After wicking the solder and destroying the first LED manually (and scratching up the board a bit [IMG class=inlineimg]https://www.svrider.com/forum/images/smilies/disappointed.gif[/IMG] ), see the two dots between the contacts, that's the glue that makes this process just a wee bit harder:

After the 3rd scraped off LED I finally decided to try it with the heat gun. Using aluminum foil as a heat sink to protect the gauge, I was able to melt the glue in 1 minute (heat gun on low setting) and the LED would then come off:

After removing the LEDs for the display (6 on the bottom), the indicators (2), and the needle (2):

Caution:
The metal electrodes of the LED usually remained stuck on the contacts, I think that's because there was still a bit of solder that kept them connected. So I had to carefully scrape those copper parts off. In hindsight, using the soldering iron is preferable to scraping. Patience, young padawan!
To remove the glue residue I used a 50/50 mix of ethanol (in my case nail polish remover) and 91% alcohol on Q-tips. It did not seem to have much of an effect though. Then I went over it again with contact cleaner and compressed air.
Finally I could go ahead with soldering 9 blue LEDs and 1 red LED to the gauge. The red LED was placed on top of the center section and is supposed to illuminate the needle only at revs above 4,000 rpm. Before that it will be blue. This was an accidental mod by ADVARP which I thought turned out great and took the liberty to adopt for myself; see his thread here with good infos.
I first applied flux and solder on one side of each contact, then placed the new LED on the solder, melted it and pushed the LED down; then I flowed solder on the other side of the contact without disturbing the LED, making sure there was enough solder to flow slightly under and up the sides of the LED to ensure complete contact.
Here's the result:


2)
Soldering on Teeriver's Multibot was an experience in dealing with tiny 30 gauge wire (i.e. 0.25mm), tiny resistors and precision soldering.
The wire for the gear indicator needs to be tapped into in the center of the bike, which is easy thanks to the awesome Posi-tap that Teeriver provided. On the other side the wire already came with the appropriate terminal and plugged directly into a spare connector on the main gauge cluster plug. Easy peasy!
I was able to pull the cable through the inside of the harness on the last foot using a length of zip tie as a make-shift fishing wire. The rest of it was zip-tied on top of the main harness. I may find a way to route it inside the harness at some later date. Thanks to the Posi-tap the tapped wire can be removed and re-connected at at any time without disturbing the tapped wire. A real nifty invention I must say.

I'm more of an intermediate beginner when it comes to soldering and this project is not for the faint of heart if you're not that experienced in soldering...
Luckily I found a local community workshop that had professional equipment. Many thanks to NYC Resistor in Brooklyn!
They let me use a microscope and an electronically controlled iron, which made the task a lot easier. It is quite astonishing to see, how precise your hand can move within tenths of millimeters if you have magnified vision.
While I probably didn't make professional grade solder joints, it looks to me they might hold up for a while. Here's the end result:

The Kapton tape I got from eBay is not of the stickiest variety, so I was flattening it out with a plastic spatula (from my smartphone repair tool box). We'll see how it will hold up...

3)
Illumiglo is up next...
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Last edited by sv650bklyn; 10-25-2017 at 02:47 PM.
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Old 10-24-2017, 11:50 PM   #10
sv650bklyn
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Alright then, Illumiglo was up last to complete my gauge cluster mod.
The install is straight-forward and consists of carefully placing a lighted face plate over your stock one and on top of that the face plate that you are facing.
To do a better job than I did, I would recommend that you clamp down the invidual sections on one side and peel the adhesive cover off from the center out. Use a plastic card to smooth it out and hopefully you won't trap any air bubbles.


To power the face plate I decided to follow the example set by ADVARP and solder the wires to the switched power for the ignition (Pin 2, orange-green cable) and the ground wire to either Pin 8 or 16 on the other end of the pin rows.
I may eventually route the power through a proper relay so I don't risk burning a hole in my ignition wire if that converter fails... (maybe that's not a realistic danger though)
In the picture you can also see the purple wire (Pin 7) which is used by the Multibot gear indicator, normally this connector is empty.


Next step was to find room for the massive DC/AC converter. The one I had was too large to fit directly under the PC board itself, so I had to route the wires through some vent holes to the outer housing.
I used Posi-connectors to connect the power wires to the converter. This made things much easier when putting the cluster back together. Also, I have a quick way to remove/replace the converter should it break down...
The outer housing has a lot of space, and I planned to glue the converter with high-quality 3M double-side tape to the inside, however, the angled surfaces prevented a good hold. In any case, once you put the housing back together, the converter seems to be held in place by the surrounding protrusions.


When attaching the tach needle again, I just turned on the ignition, and then placed the needle directly over the "0" mark. This was a great tip from another forum post and it seems to be correct, as when I turn off the ignition the needle will rest against the needle stop after a few seconds. Turning the ignition back on brings the needle back to "0" each time. Getting the tach needle back in the right place, was concerning me, but this little trick made it very easy. Now if the needle would just light up...

So here is how the gauge looks right now in the dark:
  • Multibot seems to work (see the 'n' for neutral, and "126" for 12.6 V battery level)
  • blue LEDs and blue Illumiglo gauge look awesome!
  • but the voltage converter makes a high pitched noise; seller of Illumiglo says that is unavoidable unless they use an even bigger converter; this sound shold get drowned out by the engine noise anyways
  • the tach needle is not lit; I will have to investigate why that is....
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Last edited by sv650bklyn; 11-06-2017 at 04:16 PM.
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