$20 Swingarm Stand for the SV

Doug Roever

After purchasing my almost-new SV, I quickly realize that I needed a means to elevate the back wheel for chain cleaning and rear wheel maintenance.  Like several others who have posted ideas on SVrider.com site, I didn't want to spend the roughly $80 that a commercially available swingarm stand costs.

So, while wandering through Home Depot one day, it occurred to me that a bunch of sections of 3/4" iron pipe (the type used for household gas lines, etc., which has a fairly heavy wall, and tapered thread (NPT) ends on it) might be assembled tinker-toy style to create a relatively inexpensive, sturdy (if not lightweight) swingarm stand.  I took a few basic measurements, and  then sketched out my idea, and went to the home supply store.  The following is my bill of material for the stand:

Ref. Number

Description (all 3/4" iron pipe)

Quantity

1

3/4 x 3/4 Tee

2

2

2 1/2" Nipple / pipe

2

3

Cap

2

4

12" pipe

2

5

45 degree elbow

2

6

10" pipe

2

7

90 degree elbow

2

8

10" pipe

2

9

12" pipe

1

10

8mm-1.0 x 3" hex bolts

2

11

8mm-1.25 hex nuts

2

The photo below shows the various parts labelled:

Creator: PolyViewÆ Version 3.53 by Polybytes

Quality: 75

Not shown in this picture are the 8mm bolts and nuts, which thread into the spool mounts on the swingarm.  The notches in the uprights (8) in the photo receive the bolts threaded fully into the spool mounts.

Basically this stand goes together tinker-toy style, with the following notes:

The 8mm bolts and nuts are installed into the swingarm spool mounts as shown in the following photo:

Creator: PolyViewÆ Version 3.53 by Polybytes

Quality: 75

With the 2 1/2" pipes as component numbers (2), the rear wheel ends up about 1 1/2" off of the garage floor.   The next photo shows the SV up on the stand:

Creator: PolyViewÆ Version 3.53 by Polybytes

Quality: 75

The bike is quite stable on the stand, it it takes perhaps a 20-30 pound push to lift the bike up and over center.  It will be more stable once the joints are welded in place.

From the back, it looks something like this:

Creator: PolyViewÆ Version 3.53 by Polybytes

Quality: 75

Finally, for the usual disclaimer (credit goes to Wayne Mock for the verbage from his swingarm pivot stand writeup):

NOTE - PLEASE USE CAUTION WHEN USING THIS LIFT/STAND. YOU ARE DEALING WITH A 400 POUND MOTORCYCLE THAT CAN CAUSE MUCH DAMAGE TO PEOPLE/PROPERTY IF IT FALLS. I WOULD SUGGEST HAVING A STRONG FRIEND CLOSE BY THE FIRST TIME YOU USE THIS STAND, JUST IN CASE. I MAKE NO GUARANTEES REGARDING THE STRENGTH/SUITABILITY OF THIS STAND FOR YOUR USE. I HAVE ONLY DESCRIBED THE CONSTRUCTION OF A STAND THAT WORKS FOR ME.