Making the Clutch pull lighter [Archive] - Suzuki SV650 Forum: SV650, SV1000, Gladius Forums

: Making the Clutch pull lighter


Nate4s
03-22-2012, 11:02 PM
I own a 2002 SV650s, in Silver (not the fastest color ;) ) with 3,850 miles on it - I've put 2100 miles on it in the last 5 months, not sure how the previous riders/owners werent riding it.

I just replaced the clutch cable to see if I could lighten my clutch pull even further. Everything is lubed and clean when dealing with the clutch and cable. I've never pulled another SV clutch in, so I don't know how difficult it's supposed to be - and I don't have a scale, so I can't really weigh mine. My clutch pull is very smooth, it's just a bit heavy for my carpal tunnel wrists and I would like it to be lighter if possible.

I was wondering if you can replace the clutch lever return spring (sorry, not sure of it's real name) with something lighter - the spring I'm talking about is the one right under the sprocket cover. Are there any repercussions for doing this? Is there a reason the clutch lever needs to be under such high tension? Thanks in advance for the help!

volke44
03-22-2012, 11:59 PM
You could try one of the easy-pull clutch levers on the market, I personally haven't tried them but have heard lots of positive things on forums.

The best quality / best reviewed one seems to be the righteous stunt clutch (http://www.righteousstuntmetal.com/) but it's pretty pricey. I would have one myself if it wasn't so expensive. There are also alternatives that are cheaper, Moose makes one, Outlaw racing makes one, RTC makes one.

ineedanap
03-23-2012, 12:57 AM
I was wondering if you can replace the clutch lever return spring (sorry, not sure of it's real name) with something lighter - the spring I'm talking about is the one right under the sprocket cover.

That is one small spring. You still have to fight against the 6 big springs on the pressure plate. If you took it off I don't know if you'd even notice.

Nate4s
03-23-2012, 01:02 AM
Thanks for the link! I suppose I was looking for the poor man's quick fix, but those levers aren't TOO unreasonable - about $85-$95 for a full lever. I'll keep checking around for alternative fixes, but I'll definitely look into those options if I get too lazy/become a bigger baby about my current lever. I can do 150 miles and survive just fine with my current lever...but I wouldn't complain about it being even easier... :D

WarwickE36
03-29-2012, 03:39 PM
Come ride my other bike, a '74 Honda cb550 you'll go running back to your SV clutch

whats a v-twin???
03-29-2012, 08:15 PM
I havent searched, but a larger slave cylinder will do the job if theres one out there that will fit properly

Nate4s
03-30-2012, 01:26 AM
Come ride my other bike, a '74 Honda cb550 you'll go running back to your SV clutch

Haha. No doubt they get worse. I just wondered what the norm was, or if that's something people ever attempt to tamper with. I had a Suzuki GZ250 with a clutch pull that felt like the cable end was attached to a single, used rubber band...it worked great, and the pull was set for a 4 month old. :D

Jan Zoellner
03-30-2012, 06:14 AM
I havent searched, but a larger slave cylinder will do the job if theres one out there that will fit properlyNot on a cable clutch. :)
A longer lever on the lower clutch mechanism, though... see post below.

Ciao
Jan

Jan Zoellner
03-30-2012, 06:22 AM
Thanks for the link! I suppose I was looking for the poor man's quick fix,
See here (http://www.svrider.com/forum/showpost.php?p=738517&postcount=4).

The first mod already helps a bit and is very easy.
Second one is a bit more involved (references to a german page). The third pic from the bottom shows how it can be done without welding.

Ciao
Jan

tsmith
03-30-2012, 10:21 AM
Does just doing the first mod at the clutch lever actually make the pull lighter or does it just put it closer to the handle to make it easier to grasp?

weasel
03-30-2012, 10:36 AM
ummm, squeeze a tennisball for some hand strength!!






from the OLD dirtbiker...

wallymann
03-30-2012, 11:19 AM
ummm, squeeze a tennisball for some hand strength!!


+1. and clean/lube your cables.

kivyee
03-30-2012, 01:31 PM
Does just doing the first mod at the clutch lever actually make the pull lighter or does it just put it closer to the handle to make it easier to grasp?

Yes, the first mod just moves it closer. Essentially this will always be a trade-off between lever travel and lever actuation force, and playing within the physical bounds of the permissible lever travel and required clutch travel, short of decreasing the clutch spring force, which might decrease the clutch's ability to transmit torque.

For a low-budget change, extending the arm on the clutch actuator under the sprocket cover will probably be the lowest cost to increase your leverage. I don't however like how that introduces a bend in the clutch cable as it comes out of the adjuster.

Also, as someone else mentioned, lubing the cable and removing/increasing the radius of any bends in the routing of the cable (if possible) will also reduce the drag force on the cable.

The other potential is of course swapping a hydraulic clutch system (e.g. ala Sv1000) MIGHT help, as you get to play around with master/slave cylinder size to fine tune the system to what you need. This is of course likely the most effort/dollar intensive solution.

Jan Zoellner
04-02-2012, 01:26 AM
short of decreasing the clutch spring force, which might decrease the clutch's ability to transmit torque.Hasn´t been an issue at all. Of course you lose some adjustment range (essentially you´re introducing more cable play and covering part of it with the rubber washer). I´d see problems the other way round: If you´re going too far, the clutch won´t fully disengage when the lever is completely pulled, increasing wear (the SV being a wet clutch makes it less of a problem) and making it difficult to switch to neutral.

For a low-budget change, extending the arm on the clutch actuator under the sprocket cover will probably be the lowest cost to increase your leverage. I don't however like how that introduces a bend in the clutch cable as it comes out of the adjuster.I´m not a big fan of this, too, but it has been working flawlessly for more than 20.000 km now. A friend modded the cable routing for exactly this reason, to be seen in one of the later pics on the page.

The other potential is of course swapping a hydraulic clutch system (e.g. ala Sv1000) MIGHT help, as you get to play around with master/slave cylinder size to fine tune the system to what you need.Since you can´t defy physics, swapping to hydraulics for easier action will equally result in less adjustment range at the lever. I have such a conversion because with the clipons I use the cable routing interfered with the upper triple. I had an SV1000 setup with the original SV1000 lever (14 mm bore) which was quite stiff in action. Switching to an Aprilia mille master (12 mm) made clutch pull a lot easier while obviously increasing needed travel at the lever thus making precise adjustment more of an issue.

Both setups perform nearly equal regarding needed force.

Ciao
Jan

kivyee
04-03-2012, 07:21 PM
Hasn´t been an issue at all. Of course you lose some adjustment range (essentially you´re introducing more cable play and covering part of it with the rubber washer). I´d see problems the other way round: If you´re going too far, the clutch won´t fully disengage when the lever is completely pulled, increasing wear (the SV being a wet clutch makes it less of a problem) and making it difficult to switch to neutral.


I'm talking about the actual springs in the clutch assembly - which is what provides the torque transmission capability of the clutch.

Since you can´t defy physics, swapping to hydraulics for easier action will equally result in less adjustment range at the lever.

My point was that you can fine tune, not that it defies physics. Or you could weld different length arms, or have arms with multiple holes. But you do gain a little in terms of not having to deal with cable drag. Of course using a hydraulic clutch opens up the options of using some sort of vacuum assist :D

Good to see your experience trying the various options and thanks for sharing them.

Jan Zoellner
04-04-2012, 05:06 AM
I'm talking about the actual springs in the clutch assembly - which is what provides the torque transmission capability of the clutch.I know what you mean - basically the equivalent to having the clutch lightly pulled all the time. Having enough cable play prevents that, but could lead to the problem I described. One can play between these points.

My point was that you can fine tune, not that it defies physics. Or you could weld different length arms, or have arms with multiple holes.I probably misinterpreted your statement such as if you had suggested that a hydraulic setup will give you variation options the mechanical one doesn´t give.
You have a fixed point: pushrod actuation at the clutch. No matter what (unassisted) mechanical transmission you put between the lever and the pushrod, the overall results will be the same - modulo things like cable drag.

But you do gain a little in terms of not having to deal with cable drag.That´s right - intrestingly, cable drag assists a bit when having the clutch pulled in for a longer time (like standing on a red light). With the hydraulic clutch, you have to apply full force the whole time.

All in all it seems we´re quite in agreement. :)

Of course using a hydraulic clutch opens up the options of using some sort of vacuum assist :DI´d probably not venture into that, but it´s an interesting idea.

Ciao
Jan

RichDesmond
04-04-2012, 07:01 AM
Try a better lever first. My left hand is messed up, index and middle fingers don't really bend so I pull in the clutch with my pinkie and the ring finger stump. Pazzo clutch lever helped a lot. The bend is better and the adjustment lets me position at exactly the right spot.

racinteach
04-04-2012, 12:30 PM
Moose racing use to make a box called the ez pull or something along those lines. Don't go messing with the mechanical stuff. You will create more problems then you think in the long run. Other option and the best safest one is lighter pressure plate springs, but then you could have clutch slippage under hard use.

Try the box it made it really easy..

Another thing that helped out some folks was changing to a older gsxr perch and lever.. change the fulcrum point for more leverage..

Jan Zoellner
04-05-2012, 03:51 AM
Moose racing use to make a box called the ez pull or something along those lines.Probably this: http://www.motorcycle-superstore.com/2/9/192/4223/ITEM/Moose-Racing-Easy-Pull-Clutch-System.aspx

Don't go messing with the mechanical stuff.The Moose racing thingy does exactly that (to quote from the site: "Inner linkage increases leverage ratio"), just in a prepackaged box.
But it saves you from tinkering yourself, is apparently adjustable and thus seems a very good option for the price listed.

You will create more problems then you think in the long run.Which ones, specifically?

Another thing that helped out some folks was changing to a older gsxr perch and lever.. change the fulcrum point for more leverage..Unfortunately the one I tried to use for my wife had a long lever reach and was unsuitable for her.

Ciao
Jan