I just watched the Tom Pryce F1 crash... [Archive] - Suzuki SV650 Forum: SV650, SV1000, Gladius Forums

: I just watched the Tom Pryce F1 crash...


armyowalgreens
03-05-2011, 03:00 AM
:confused3:

That is one video I really wish I skipped.

mrk66
03-05-2011, 06:23 AM
http://www.dailymotion.com/video/x1l40f_f1-tom-pryce-fatal-crash_shortfilms

Since the OP couldn't seem to cut and paste. There is the link.

Yah, that is horrible.

Remember kids, look both ways before you cross the street.

Bigham
03-05-2011, 05:27 PM
did the driver die because the chicken did not know how to cross a da road? I donna unnerstand spanish or italian or whatever they was speeking

nyc rugby
03-06-2011, 01:07 AM
did the driver die because the chicken did not know how to cross a da road? I donna unnerstand spanish or italian or whatever they was speeking

Another driver pulled to the side of the track due to an engine fire on the staightaway. A track worker ran across the track with a fire extinguisher to put it out. Pryce hit him, cut him in two, and was decapitated when the fire extinguisher hit him in the head.

Bob_M
03-06-2011, 01:11 AM
Thats whats called a real bad day at the track.

Fatass SVS
03-06-2011, 05:48 AM
F1 regularly lost drivers in years past. Peter Collins' and Taffy von Trips' deaths so deeply affected Stirling Moss that after his own crash, he decided not to return to racing. Horrific, fiery deaths which befell people like Lorenzo Bandini, Jo Schelsser, and Piers Courage were a common occurence when I was young. I can still remember the personal loss at hearing news of Jimmy Clark's death in April 1968 at a Formula 2 race. Racing wasn't just a European risk. Eddie Sachs and Dave McDonald died in a particularly gruesome and fiery crash at Indianapolis in 1964. But a decade before, crashes at Le Mans and the Mille Miglia, which killed spectators as well as participants, almost killed automobile racing outright in Europe.

By the 1960s, F1 cars were really just fuel tanks bolted to engines, with a dry slot of the driver to slide into. Dan Gurney's 1967 Spa-winning Eagle-Westlake didn't even have seat belts, such was the low concern for safety in those days. Slowly however that changed. Drivers like Jackie Stewart had their manhood questioned (by people who didn't actually risk their own livbes) when they began to refuse to race at the most dangerous venues. Nurburgring, 14 miles of challenging Eifelwald, was one of the first to go. One by one the great traditional F1 tracks were either re-configured with run-off areas and better barriers, or were dropped from the F1 circus. Spa, absent for many years, returned as a smaller, safer track. Zandvoort is gone. A re-configured Hockenheim replaced Nurbirgring. I miss seeing F1 cars running at places on the Nurburgring like Flugplatz and Karrousel, but I don't miss losing drivers I've come to admire.

Drivers still die. But it's been more than a decade since Ayrton Senna's death in 1994. However, Earnhardt's and Adam Petty's deaths show that even a steel cage can't protect a human from the deadly forces of racing.

bfeils
03-06-2011, 07:49 AM
After the fire extinguisher hit him in the head it hit the roll bar with enough force to send it over the grand stands and smash a car in the parking lot. Just a ton of kinetic energy involved at 170 mph.

Bigham
03-06-2011, 02:50 PM
wow-did not realize it was the fire extinguisher. That's rough.

all I do is win
03-06-2011, 05:12 PM
i wish i could un-see this

BKK Jack
03-06-2011, 07:53 PM
Drivers still die. But it's been more than a decade since Ayrton Senna's death in 1994. However, Earnhardt's and Adam Petty's deaths show that even a steel cage can't protect a human from the deadly forces of racing.

I saw a news report about the tribute to Earnhardt at this year's Daytona 500, and was reminded how moronic, er ironic his death was. I wonder how many of the fans holding up 3 fingers realize that but for a simple decision to wear the Hans device, he might still racing today.

bighammer
03-06-2011, 08:50 PM
What? Earnhardt died? :sbmfacepalm:

Orange_4x4
03-07-2011, 09:28 AM
I saw a news report about the tribute to Earnhardt at this year's Daytona 500, and was reminded how moronic, er ironic his death was. I wonder how many of the fans holding up 3 fingers realize that but for a simple decision to wear the Hans device, he might still racing today.

Did they have HANS back then, or was the tribute tying in the fact that HANS is now available to protect against those kinds of injuries?

Fatass SVS
03-07-2011, 09:42 AM
HANS was available. It had been available since the mid-90s or so.

[M]any drivers, including Earnhardt Sr.,[5] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HANS_device#cite_note-Hinton-4) resisted the HANS (and similar) devices, claiming them to be uncomfortable, more restrictive and fearing that it would cause more injuries and problems than it prevented. Some stated that the positioning of the device made the seat belts feel less secure or rubbed on the shoulders or collar bone. Earnhardt Sr. himself referred to the device as "that **** noose (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Noose)", claiming the tethers would sooner hang (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hanging) him than save him in the event of a crash.[5] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HANS_device#cite_note-Hinton-4) However, drivers were not willing to participate in the process of perfecting the fit, and endure the limitations imposed by such devices.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HANS_device

BKK Jack
03-07-2011, 12:03 PM
Thanks Fatass.

So, you see the irony, Earnhardt eschewed wearing the device, calling it a noose and died from a "hangman's fracture," the very injury "that **** noose" was designed to prevent.

Whatever Dude
03-07-2011, 12:20 PM
i thought earnhardt's seatbelt failed?

But I admit i dont watch..just what i vaguely recall hearing when it happened.

BKK Jack
03-07-2011, 02:01 PM
From wiki:

Association with auto racing

Basilar skull fracture is a common cause of death in auto racing accidents:

* Formula One driver Roland Ratzenberger in the 1994 San Marino Formula One Grand Prix
* Indianapolis 500 drivers Bill Vukovich, Tony Bettenhausen, Floyd Roberts, and Scott Brayton.
* NASCAR drivers Dale Earnhardt Sr., Adam Petty, Tony Roper, Kenny Irwin, Jr., Neil Bonnett, John Nemechek, J. D. McDuffie, Richie Evans, and Clifford Allison. A driver named Stanley Smith also suffered the injury, but recovered.
* CART drivers Jovy Marcelo, Greg Moore and Gonzalo Rodriguez
* ARCA driver Blaise Alexander

To prevent this injury, all major motor sports sanctioning bodies now mandate the use of head and neck restraints, such as the HANS device.

Whatever Dude
03-07-2011, 02:15 PM
I give you my official "You're using wiki as a source?" eyeroll:

:rolleyes:

BKK Jack
03-07-2011, 02:31 PM
Point taken, but in this case I was too lazy to look anywhere else, because I remember the wailing and gnashing of teeth when it happened. It was what the nascar (lower case intentional) folks call a "one-o'clock hit." Apparently blasting a wall on the right front causes the perfect combination of forces to wrest your grape from its stem.

armyowalgreens
03-07-2011, 02:43 PM
His harnesses did not fail. That's one of the major contributing factors to his death. The rest of his body was properly held down. Leaving his neck and head completely unprotected from hyperextension injuries.

Fatass SVS
03-07-2011, 02:52 PM
:rolleyes:
I accept your eye-roll of contempt. But wiki is a pretty handy source (depending on who last edited it.:rolleyes:)